Call 888-339-4248

24/7 Emergency Service:
Call 508-295-7336

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

Bringing More Power with WINCO Generators

- Friday, May 28, 2021
South Shore Generator - VOLVO, 16L, Tier II

WINCO recently expanded the diesel line by offering new Volvo powered models. This provides more power without the need of paralleling two units. The four new models provide 450kW, 500kW, 550kW, and 600kW.

The Engine - VOLVO, 16L, Tier II

When designing these units, a strong, dependable engine brand was needed that could carry the load demand. Volvo has 100 years of industrial engine experience. These engines are built with prime power durability.

Features

Optional Housing

Our housing has a 77 Dba rating, the best you will find with standard housing.

LED Lighting

Standard on all housed units, automatic LED lighting makes servicing easier.

Heavy Duty Stamford PMG

The PMG allows power to the AVR to be kept near constant. This allows the AVR to quickly recover the voltage of the generator back to its nominal preset value.

Paralleling Options

These units come with paralleling options. Paralleling allows for large projects while being cost effective. The DSE8610 MKII controller represents the latest in complex load sharing & synchronizing control technology. The module has been designed to allow the operator to start, stop and synchronize the generator. If required, transfer the load to the generator either manually or automatically.

For additional details contact South Shore Generator.

Remove the Anxiety Involved with Medium Voltage Generator Systems

- Friday, May 21, 2021
South Shore Generator - Generac MPS

With the unquenchable thirst for more power, we are finding more data centers are considering medium voltage solutions that use a medium voltage alternator and ANSI C37.20.2 gear. At the same time, many staff members and contractors are hesitant to work with medium voltage systems. The solution — Generac, MPS.

By paralleling on the low voltage side and feeding one or multiple transformers, many system advantages can be realized:

  • Facility staff are typically more comfortable interacting with low voltage generators.
  • Low voltage equipment is much easier and quicker to source.
  • Low voltage rental equipment can be used when needed.
  • No medium voltage paralleling switchgear sections are required, resulting in a smaller footprint and significant cost savings
For additional details contact South Shore Generator.

The Only Automatic Emergency Generators with a Honda Engine

- Monday, May 17, 2021

The PSS12 is the only automatic emergency unit that is powered by a Honda engine. It can also be placed in both prime and standby applications.

For additional details contact South Shore Generator.

Hurricane Preparedness: Complete A Written Plan

- Saturday, May 15, 2021

The time to prepare for a hurricane is NOW, before the season begins. Once you’re under pressure, having a written plan will take the guesswork out of what you need to do to protect you and your family.

Know where you will ride out the storm and get your supplies now. You don’t want to be standing in long lines when a Hurricane Watch is issued. Those supplies that you need will probably be sold out by the time you reach the front of the line.

Being prepared now will mean the difference between your being a hurricane victim and a hurricane survivor.

ready.gov/make-a-plan

 

Hurricane Preparedness: Help Your Neighbor

- Friday, May 14, 2021

Many Americans rely on their neighbors after a disaster, but there are also many ways you can help your neighbors before a hurricane approaches. Learn about all the different actions your community can take to prepare and recover from the hazards associated with hurricanes: ready.gov/neighbors


South Shore Generators - Hurricane Preparedness

 

Hurricane Preparedness: Strengthen Your Home

- Thursday, May 13, 2021

If you plan to ride out a hurricane in your home, make sure it is in good repair and up to local hurricane building code specifications. Have the proper plywood, steel or aluminum panels to board up the windows and doors. Remember, the garage door is the most vulnerable part of the home, so it must be able to withstand high winds.

flash.org/protect.php


 

Hurricane Preparedness: Get An Insurance Checkup

- Wednesday, May 12, 2021

This Hurricane Preparedness Week, call your insurance company or agent and ask for an insurance checkup to make sure you have enough homeowners insurance to repair or even replace your home...and remember, standard homeowners insurance doesn’t cover flooding. Whether you’re a homeowner or renter, you’ll need a separate policy for flooding. floodsmart.gov. Act now as flood insurance requires a 30-day waiting period.


South Shore Generators - Hurricane Preparedness

 

Hurricane Preparedness: Assemble Disaster Supplies

- Tuesday, May 11, 2021

Just having enough supplies to make it through a hurricane isn’t enough. You need plenty to make it through what could be a LONG recovery period too. Water and electricity could be out for a week or more. Have enough non-perishable food, water and medicine to last each person in your family for a MINIMUM of three days. Also make sure you have extra cash, a battery-powered radio, flashlights, and a portable crank or solar powered USB charger to charge your cell phone.

ready.gov/kit

Hurricane Preparedness: Develop An Evacuation Plan

 

Hurricane Preparedness: Develop An Evacuation Plan

- Monday, May 10, 2021

Take some time this week - Hurricane Preparedness Week - to make sure you have a hurricane evacuation plan. The first thing you need to do is find out if you live in a storm surge hurricane evacuation zone or if you’re in a home that would be unsafe during a hurricane. If you are, figure out where you’d go and how you’d get there if told to evacuate. You do not need to travel hundreds of miles. Identify someone, perhaps a friend or relative who doesn’t live in an evacuation zone or unsafe home, and coordinate with them to use their home as your evacuation destination. Be sure to account for your pets, as most local shelters do not permit them. Put the plan in writing for you and those you care about. hurricanes.gov/prepare

Hurricane Preparedness: Develop An Evacuation Plan

 

Hurricanes and COVID-19

- Monday, May 10, 2021
South Shore Generators - Hurricanes and COVID-19

Planning for hurricane season and other potential disasters can be stressful, and during the COVID-19 pandemic, it may be especially so.

Public health and emergency response professionals have advice to help you safely prepare, evacuate, and shelter for severe storms while protecting yourself and others from COVID-19. Here are some tips to help you and your family stay safe during hurricane season this year.

Prepare for hurricane season

  • Understand that your planning may be different this year because of the need to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.
  • Give yourself more time than usual to prepare your emergency food, water, and medicine supplies. Home delivery is the safest choice for buying disaster supplies; however, that may not be an option for everyone. If in-person shopping is your only choice, take steps to protect your and others’ health when running essential errands.
  • Protect yourself and others when filling prescriptions by limiting in-person visits to the pharmacy. Sign up for mail order delivery or call in your prescription ahead of time and use drive-through windows or curbside pickup, if available.
  • Pay attention to local guidance about updated plans for evacuations and shelters, including shelters for your pets.
  • When you check on neighbors and friends, be sure to follow social distancing recommendations (staying at least 6 feet from others) and other CDC recommendations to protect yourself and others.

Prepare to evacuate

If you may need to evacuate, prepare a “go kit” with personal items you cannot do without during an emergency. Include items that can help protect you and others from COVID-19, such as hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol, bar or liquid soap, disinfectant wipes (if available) and two masks for each person. Masks should not be used by children under the age of 2. They also should not be used by people having trouble breathing, or who are unconscious, incapacitated, or unable to remove the mask without assistance.

  • Know a safe place to shelter and have several ways to receive weather alerts, such as National Weather Service cell phone alertsexternal icon, NOAA Weather Radioexternal icon, or (@NWS) Twitter alerts.
  • Find out if your local public shelter is open, in case you need to evacuate your home and go there. Your shelter location may be different this year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • If you need to go to a disaster shelter, follow CDC recommendations for staying safe and healthy in a public disaster shelter during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Follow guidance from your local public health or emergency management officials on when and where to shelter.
  • Make a plan and prepare a disaster kit for your pets. Find out if your disaster shelter will accept pets. Typically, when shelters accommodate pets, the pets are housed in a separate area from people.
  • Follow safety precautions when using transportation to evacuate. If you have to travel away from your community to evacuate, follow safety precautions for travelers to protect yourself and others from COVID-19.

Staying with friends or family

If you will be staying with friends or family outside your household to evacuate from the storm:

  • Talk to the people you plan to stay with about how you can all best protect yourselves from COVID-19.
  • Consider if either of your households has someone who is at higher risk of developing severe illness from COVID-19, including older adults or people of any age who have underlying medical conditions. Make sure everyone knows what they can do to keep them safe from COVID-19.
  • Follow everyday preventive actions, including covering coughs and sneezes, washing your hands often, and avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands. Consider taking extra precautions for people living in close quarters.
  • Know what to do if someone in your family or in the household you are staying with becomes sick with COVID-19. Take steps to keep your pets safe.

Stay safe after a hurricane

In addition to following guidance for staying safe and healthy after a hurricane, note that:

  • You should continue to follow preventive actions to protect yourself and others from COVID-19, like washing your hands and wearing a mask during cleanup or when returning home.
  • It may take longer than usual to restore power and water if they are out. Take steps to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning if you use a generator.
  • If you are injured or ill, contact your medical provider for treatment recommendations. Keep wounds clean to prevent infection. Remember, accessing medical care may be more difficult than usual during the pandemic.
  • Dealing with disasters can cause stress and strong emotions, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is natural to feel anxiety, grief, and worry. Coping with these feelings and getting help when you need it will help you, your family, and your community recover.
  • People with preexisting mental health conditions should continue with their treatment and be aware of new or worsening symptoms. Additional information can be found at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administrationexternal icon page.
  • After a hurricane, it’s not unusual for rats, mice, and other pests to try to get into your home or building. Be aware that with restaurant and commercial closures related to COVID-19, there are already reports of increased rodent activity as they try to seek other sources of food. Follow recommendations for keeping pests out of your home.

Source: cdc.gov


1 2 Next

Recent Posts


Tags


Archive

Does your current generator provider stack up?

Authorized dealers for