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Medical Data Center Secures Records With Generac Modular Power System

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, March 21, 2019
South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA

In the midst of a facility expansion in March 2007, MVP Health Care (MVP), Rochester, N.Y., decided that a reliable mode of standby power was required to ensure smooth operations and to keep all of its clients’ medical records and information safely housed. MVP, a health care provider in Vermont, New Hampshire and New York state, has been committed for 27 years to making a positive impact on the health and wellness of its customers. The need to keep medical records and information safe was a logical investment and consistent with thecompany’s mission.

While there was an immediate need for a larger location, MVP also needed to allow for future growth. The goal was that no matter how much the company grew, there would always be backup power protection should there be an outage due to the inclement weather that is typical of Rochester, especially during the winter months. When Generac Industrial Power dealer R.L. Kistler learned of MVP’s interest in standby power, Rob Sweeney, sales engineer, knew he had a system to satisfy its needs.

Based in Rochester, R.L. Kistler has been a Generac dealer since 2002, covering much of the upstate New York area including Buffalo and the state capital of Albany. Sweeney was approached for this project by the engineer, Mark Picard, owner, Picard Engineering, Rochester, who was originally looking for backup power that had either a single engine or a modular system; this was still up for debate.

“When Mark told me what they were looking for, I knew right away that the Generac Modular Power System (MPS) was the way for them to go. They had an immediate load demand of 1,100 kilowatts (kW) and wanted a system that had the potential to reach 1,600 kW, if needed,” says Sweeney.

“They were also in the market for a system that ran on natural gas rather than diesel due to storage limitations stemming from MVP’s metropolitan location and the fact that natural gas offered extended run times without concern for refueling. I told Mark he’d be hard-pressed to find a competitive system that would be able to not only meet their demands, but also be reasonably priced. After he had an opportunity to shop around, the job was ours.”

An Installation with Room to Grow R.L. Kistler administered the paralleled installation of 4 x 300 kW Generac natural gas generators in August 2008. Because MVP intended to grow over time, the company needed a system that was modular and did not need to be replaced every time it expanded. As the installation began, Sweeney wanted to make it as easy as possible for the building to add onto the four existing gensets as needed. “We installed a concrete pad designed to hold a maximum of six, 300 kW generators. So when the time comes to expand the system, there is room for two more 300 kW Generac MPS generators, making the placement less labor intensive,” says Sweeney.

In addition to the versatility that comes with a Generac MPS, price was also a factor. In the past, the high cost of paralleling switchgear made the multiple unit arrangement feasible only for expensive, high-end applications. If MVP had gone with a traditional paralleling approach, they would have had to use 14 to 20 controllers from five different manufacturers. However, the Generac MPS Power Manager control technology only requires one digital control per generator to control all generator functions: speed governing, voltage regulation, genset alarm and monitoring, synchronizing, load sharing and protection – a much simpler and cost-saving approach.

Advanced microprocessors with highspeed, 32-bit digital electronics are integrated into the MPS controllers, providing paralleling capability and reducing equipment, maintenance and installation costs. Constantly monitoring power flow, controlling transfer switch functions and managing the operations of all connected generators are just a few of the features offered by the MPS controllers. The beauty of the Generac MPS system is that each genset backs up the others in the system, so critical loads receive state-ofthe-art redundant protection, in addition to providing all the benefits of paralleled power generation in a simple, single-source system.

Looking to the Future

Today, the Generac MPS system backs up three floors, one of which houses the main data center -- a total of 50,400 square feet - and MVP has no plans to stop there. “This ear, we’ll be adding another 150 servers to our data center on the first floor and while we are appropriately sized right now, we have space to add two more 300 kW gensets and in time that’s exactly what we plan to do,” says Craig Solow, supervisor of windows administration, MVP. “We could not be more pleased with the natural gas MPS system from Generac. Out of our 10 sites, the Rochester location is the only one that has a modular backup system, the rest are running on single systems and I am confident that the Generac MPS system is the most secure. Since we installed the Generac MPS system, we’ve had a few outages, some planned, some unexpected, but whatever the case, the transition to standby power was seamless. The MPS system started right up and kept us operating at business as usual for the entire length of every outage. Most companies fear outages, and while we don’t look forward to them, we know that we’re covered.”

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Emergency Power for Municipalities

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 04, 2019
South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA

Municipalities are continually asked to do more with less whether its maintaining municipal buildings, providing a vast array of community services, or providing protection for citizens during emergencies. There is no one “cookie-cutter” generator solution that will meet the incredibly diverse needs of municipalities. The good news is that Generac Industrial Power provides a wide range of gensets, accessories, controllers, and enclosures, so we can help you find the optimum solution to surpass your challenges.

Your Need: Emergency Preparedness

With major hurricanes and massive flooding that can occur at any time, the role of emergency preparedness is very great. Citizens not only depend upon crisis services including first responders and 911 call centers, but they also look to municipal facilities for shelter during the storm. Authorities may also need municipal buildings to act as command centers in the wake of a disaster.

If that were not enough, FEMA and other governmental agencies are asking cities and towns to deliver more robust support systems to community members living in underserved areas and government-sponsored housing unit.

Police and fire stations, and 911 call centers must function during emergencies. Generac provides diesel gensets from 50 kW up to 2 MW to meet NEC and NFPA requirements for on-site fuel. And many of these gensets can be paralleled to meet even greater power requirements. Generac’s Modular Power Systems (MPS) feature on-generator paralleling so our units do not require dedicated and expensive third-party switchgear.

Future expansion generators simply tie directly to the generator bus. Because the paralleling is already built into the generator, the Generac MPS system inherently has greater flexibility for growth, requires less electrical room space, and reduces initial capital cost, which can help with your always tight budgets.

Paralleling also works for many government housing units as rooftop installations are being specified so flooding doesn’t impact power supply. MPS gensets are smaller and lighter weight which helps balance the rooftop load, while still providing the needed kWs.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Industrial Power for a Backup Power Solution: A University Case Study

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 08, 2018

To protect their employees and expansive data center, the University of Utah turned to Generac Industrial Power for a backup power solution that could safeguard their infrastructure, fit in a limited space and meet their strict budgeting needs.

Watch the video below.


For more information on industrial back up power for education, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: generac.com

Industrial Generators Help Municipalities Serve and Protect Communities

Joseph Coupal - Monday, August 06, 2018
South Shore Generators - Back Up Power for Data Centers

Municipalities are continually asked to do more with less whether its maintaining municipal buildings, providing a vast array of community services, or providing protection for citizens during emergencies. There is no one “cookie-cutter” generator solution that will meet the incredibly diverse needs of municipalities. The good news is that Generac Industrial Power provides a wide range of gensets, accessories, controllers, and enclosures, so we can help you find the optimum solution to surpass your challenges.

Your Need: Emergency Preparedness

With major hurricanes and massive flooding that can occur at any time, the role of emergency preparedness is very great. Citizens not only depend upon crisis services including first responders and 911 call centers, but they also look to municipal facilities for shelter during the storm. Authorities may also need municipal buildings to act as command centers in the wake of a disaster.

If that were not enough, FEMA and other governmental agencies are asking cities and towns to deliver more robust support systems to community members living in underserved areas and government-sponsored housing unit.

Standy Power for Emergency Services

Police and fire stations, and 911 call centers must function during emergencies. Generac provides diesel gensets from 50 kW up to 2 MW to meet NEC and NFPA requirements for on-site fuel. And many of these gensets can be paralleled to meet even greater power requirements. Generac’s Modular Power Systems (MPS) feature on-generator paralleling so our units do not require dedicated and expensive third-party switchgear.

Future expansion generators simply tie directly to the generator bus. Because the paralleling is already built into the generator, the Generac MPS system inherently has greater flexibility for growth, requires less electrical room space, and reduces initial capital cost, which can help with your always tight budgets.

Paralleling also works for many government housing units as rooftop installations are being specified so flooding doesn’t impact power supply. MPS gensets are smaller and lighter weight which helps balance the rooftop load, while still providing the needed kWs.

For more information in industrial generators for municipalities, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: Generac.com

Back Up Power for Data Centers

Joseph Coupal - Monday, July 02, 2018
South Shore Generators - Back Up Power for Data Centers

You provide your customers with a 99.999% uptime guarantee, standard in the industry. Your company may also be supporting multi-tenancy computing, co-location, and facilitating new platforms around cloud computing and virtualization. These platforms have new power requirements. Average power consumption at the rack is going up and more power needs to be available to support growth and backup/emergency power supplies.

Generac Industrial Power responds to these challenges with genset systems that deliver the best available technology with massive kWs and a support network offering industry-leading expertise.

Been There, Done That

Continuous duty, onsite power is one of the key factors that is required for data centers to obtain Tier III or Tier IV certification from the Uptime Institute. Continuous power is used for applications where there is no utility power and the generator set is relied upon to supply a constant load for an unlimited number of hours annually such as remote power stations or co-location facilities. Generac provides a range of solutions that have been used nationwide in Tier Certified facilities.

BACK IT UP WITH GENERAC'S MPS

Generac’s proven Modular Power System (MPS) for paralleling generators offers data centers the power, redundancy, scalability, and safety required. One of the key advantages is that you can specify the backup system for the power you need now, not in future. This allows you to spend more of your initial capital on servers and other equipment. And, as you power needs grow, it’s easy to “add on” another generator to meet your growing needs.

The MPS approach does not require paralleling controls in dedicated third-party switchgear, so expansion generators can either simply tie directly to the generator bus, or to a breaker on that bus. And the generators do not have to be next to each other on a pad to be paralleled, so you can spread the field and your potential risk.

In addition, our MPS allows you to combine fuel options: diesel, natural gas, or even bi-fuel. This not only gives you have the benefits of genset redundancy, you also have fuel redundancy. And natural gas relies on a strong underground pipeline network that is rarely impacted by weather or other crisis events—providing another critical advantage.

For more information on back-up power, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

New Generac 625 Kw Gaseous Unit Designed To Compete Favorably With Diesel Nodes

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, March 08, 2018
South Shore Generator - 625 Kw Gaseous Unit in Wareham, MA

As the leader in spark-ignited power generation, Generac Industrial Power has introduced its largest gaseous gen-set node: the 625 kW unit. Available in single-set or MPS configurations, the 625 kW gen-set is designed for demand response applications as well as emergency standby for data centers, commercial and industrial facilities, healthcare applications, infrastructure projects and the like.

The 625 kW generator is driven by Generac’s new 33.9 L spark-ignited engine. Engineered from a proven diesel block, it is the first engine to utilize fuel and spark systems from the company’s recent Motortech acquisition. The result is a larger-displacement platform with high power density — a strong competitor to the performance of diesel platforms.

The 33.9 L engine was also designed for high load acceptance and fast transient response, capable of meeting NFPA 110 Type 10 start-time requirements. It has been optimized for use in a wide range of temperatures, from a high of 122 degrees F down to -20 degrees F with a winterization kit.

The engine is U.S. EPA certified at the factory for stationary emergency operations. For demand response applications, it is factory certified for stationary non-emergency operation.

Unique to the 625 kW machine is Generac’s new Power Zone® control system. Designed by Generac specifically for its industrial power systems, the Power Zone controller is the first on the market with built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and LAN connections, putting monitoring and control within easy reach of any mobile device or PC.

The Power Zone’s on-board 7-in. color resistive touchscreen provides instance access to generator and engine parameters, ensuring the unit is ready and available at a moment’s notice. The interface was designed with intuitive icons as well as app-like navigation.

The Power Zone controller also controls all paralleling functions when the generator is used in an MPS configuration. No additional system or master controller is required. Communication between generators is performed with an industry-first redundant Ethernet. A permissive and load-shed assembly is available for MPS applications to sequence multiple transfer switches.

The 625 kW unit is designed to run on natural gas fuel only. It is available as either an open set or with one of three enclosure types: weather protected, Level 1 sound attenuated or Level 2 sound attenuated.

The generator is available for quoting and ordering now, and will be available to ship in the beginning of Q2 2018.

For more information on Gas Generator sets, contact South Shore Generator.

The Use of Natural Gas Generators, Is Natural Gas or Diesel More Acceptable in MA?

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 23, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac Natural Gas Generators

Generac Industrial Power recently attended the 2017 NFPA conference in Boston, Mass. to discuss the use of natural gas generators in emergency system applications with the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) community.

The reliability of natural gas as fuel for emergency generator applications tends to create interesting discussions within the market. As the standard for standby power generation, NFPA 110, has plenty to say about reliability concerns and best practices relative to adequately maintaining on-site diesel. However, it provides little guidance for the acceptance of natural gas reliability. The National Electric Code (NEC) article 700.12(B)(3) states: “Prime movers shall not be solely dependent on a public utility gas system for their fuel supply - except: ‘Where acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, the use of other than on-site fuels shall be permitted where there is a low probability of a simultaneous failure of both the off-site fuel delivery system and power from the outside electrical utility company.’”

So what is reliable enough? According to a 2013 report by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Lincoln Laboratory, natural gas distribution systems operate at a reliability rate exceeding 99.999 percent, with the exception of seismically active areas. Incidentally, that makes the natural gas distribution system approximately one thousand times more reliable than a single-engine generator set, which is typically assumed to be 99 percent reliable. To probe these questions, Generac surveyed 110 attendees at the NFPA show with three questions:

Is natural gas acceptable in your area?

The first asked if natural gas was an acceptable fuel for emergency system applications in their jurisdiction. Sixty-four percent replied yes; another 25 percent was uncertain. This illustrated a very high acceptance rate that mirrors the explosive growth in natural gas generators documented by Frost and Sullivan – 38 percent of the total North American market revenue is now natural gas generators, which is up from 28 percent only three years prior.

Who dictates acceptance? What guidelines exist?

The second question asked who determines if natural gas is an acceptable fuel for emergency systems and whether there are guidelines for accepting or rejecting this continuous fuel source. To this question, the respondents identified AHJ & fire marshal by 36 percent, but 43 perecent were uncertain. None of the respondents provided guidance regarding guidelines for acceptance. This highlights some of the challenges that are created when the code uses subjective language and provides little guidance regarding reliability. To that end, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) created a guideline regarding the evaluation of natural gas generators for nursing homes. The reliability of a natural gas fuel source can be proven with a letter from the natural gas vendor that contains the following:

  • A statement that the fuel source is reasonably reliable
  • A description supporting the assertion that the source is reasonably reliable
  • A statement of the low likelihood of an interruption
  • A description supporting the assertion that the likelihood of interruption is low
  • A signature from technical personnel

Similar processes, which leverage a letter from the local gas utility, are often utilized by the AHJ community when natural gas reliability is perceived as questionable within the market. Another method for determining reliability may leverage the guidance given for determining electric utility reliability in fire pump applications. NFPA 20 A.9.3.2 defines reliable as not having experienced any shutdowns longer than four continuous hours in the year prior to planning. This standard does not require the utility source to be infallible; it only requires a utility source free from routine outages. Using these criteria, most natural gas systems across the United States should be deemed reliable.

What is your personal perception of natural gas?

The last question focused on each attendee’s personal perception of natural gas reliability. Fifty-five percent of the respondents felt natural gas was favorable to diesel with 38 percent uncertain. This relatively high perception of natural gas reliability is influenced by personal experiences with hurricanes Irene and Sandy, both of which destroyed the long-standing conventional wisdom that diesel fuel delivery was assured even during the most severe emergencies. Both storms caused enough damage to the petroleum supply networks, making refueling requirements a challenge. Hurricane Sandy devastated fuel terminals across the Northeast. Even if a delivery truck was able to get to a terminal, it was unlikely it would be able to obtain fuel. The available fuel and trucks within the region were often redirected by the government to hospitals and targeted emergency response facilities.

It is incorrect to conclude that diesel fuel, simply by its on-site presence, is more reliable than natural gas. A reliable fuel supply is one that is consistently available in sufficient quantity and quality to ensure reliable emergency power. It is necessary to holistically examine external factors influencing the relative reliability of natural gas and diesel.

The Boston NFPA conference allowed Generac a great opportunity to explore these topics directly with a cross section of the AHJ community. These insights help illustrate that natural gas acceptance continues to grow within markets that have an established natural gas infrastructure. In these markets, the resulting awareness and acceptance of natural gas-fueled emergency generators is quite high.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: generac.com


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