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Back Up Generators for Data Centers and Financial Institutions

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 29, 2018
South Shore Generator - KOLHER Industrial Generator

Big data has changed the world. We generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily—data that businesses, governments and people depend on. Further fueled by mobile devices and data-on-demand business, there are ever-growing demands on service levels in data centers around the world. Cloud computing and the Internet of Things are driving 12 percent growth per year in the data center market. The expectations for peak performance and uninterruptible power have never been higher.

The data center market itself is changing too. Data centers are moving closer to their customers, colocating and adopting multitenant architecture more than ever before. Many are becoming smaller and more scalable. Tax and energy incentives are common, aimed at attracting data center investment while improving the operational efficiency of these critical facilities.

Managaing Energy Use and Costs

Data centers consume vast amounts of energy to keep online businesses running at maximum capacity around-the-clock. To avoid wasting much of the electricity pulled off the grid and to improve operational costs, data centers are being designed and built with higher levels of efficiency, measured in PUE (power usage effectiveness). Today, data center owners want more sustainable ways to power their facilities and lessen their carbon footprints. Assessing your center’s needs and designing a power system that’s modular and scalable will help you optimize uptime and availability, cut energy use and provide significant savings.

Assessing Facility Needs

A data center’s electrical power supply can be provided by several different circuits and supplemented by energy storage systems and generators. To provide a “No-Break” power supply (uninterruptible power with zero service interruptions), two independent power sources provide redundancy and risk reduction, rather than depend on a single source of inbound power.

Power Supply

Redundancy is an essential design feature built into a data center to provide a double layer of security. To prevent interruptions to the power supply, all components, including the emergency systems, are installed in duplicate with multiple generator sets.

Security

There is an essential need for protecting both the data center’s physical security and its cyber security. Redundant backup power is a critical component of a secure data center—and a requirement for recognition as a Tier IV data center.

Physical Environment

Maintaining precise, stable air conditioning and optimal control of environmental dust are two more factors creating larger loads and more dependence on backup generators.

Fire Prevention

Fires must be prevented, extinguished or controlled. An ultrasophisticated detection system that ensures maximum containment must be maintained on an uninterruptible power supply.

Power Considerations

Scalability

A larger-than-necessary power system that caters to possible unknowns will increase costs and diminish efficiency. The industry is seeing a shift to scalable data centers that start small and scale up to meet increased demands. This trend is even more evident in colocated and multitenant facilities that make up the majority of new data center construction. Colocating (sharing data center space but not servers) or multitenanting (sharing servers) helps businesses achieve cost savings and efficiency.

Secure, robust data storage requires a dependable and scalable power system—one that’s capable of delivering uninterruptible power and meeting demanding service requirements.

Uptime and Reliability

Designing power systems that meet the requirement for the highest levels of uptime, such as the Uptime Institute’s Tier IV standard, requires expert attention to system architecture and equipment redundancy. Getting the right combination of uninterrupted power supply and generator sets is crucial to meet tier classifications.

Modular Data Centers

The modular data center achieved by installing and enclosing two or more generators outdoors versus building oversized generators indoors is becoming more prevalent. Each generator set provides power to specific servers. “Swing” generators come online to provide backup power if one fails, offering an option to other paralleling equipment.

Edge Data Centers

The building of smaller data centers closer to users (those on the “edge” of large metropolitan markets) is becoming more common due to network latency, which limits the maximum rate that information can be transmitted. Edge data centers provide quick-and-agile response, faster access to data and an improved experience for businesses and people that are “always on.”

Redundancy

Redundancy is an essential design feature built into a data center to provide a layer of security, known as N+1 or 2N redundancy, with essential components duplicated in the event that one component fails. While a facility might install a single large generator to meet its power needs, paralleling two or more generators with paralleling switchgear offers practical benefits and advantages over a single-generator system.

Performance

Our reliable power systems play a major role in helping data centers prevent unnecessary financial loss and security breaches in the event of a power outage. The generator provides backup power within seconds of a break in the normal power supply. Generator sets should start providing backup power within seconds of a break in utility power supply, and transfer switches should provide seamless automatic switching between the electrical power from the utility and the backup power system.

End-to-End Management

From planning the design and selecting the equipment to testing and commissioning, we’re focused on delivering reliable, custom-designed power systems tailored to your specifications. Agile manufacturing, rigorous testing and careful commissioning assure you of a solution that fits your business—and your budget.

Customized Solutions

Your power system is customized, built and tested by a dedicated team of experienced applications engineers. They’ve designed power systems for hundreds of data centers and combine industry experience with Kohler’s agile manufacturing process to deliver your purpose-built solution.

For more information on generators for data and financial institutions, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: kohler.com

Industries that Need Backup Generators

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, May 09, 2018
South Shore Generator - 625 Kw Gaseous Unit in Wareham, MA

We’ve all experienced power outages at one point or another; probably more than once. Power outages can happen anytime, anywhere and for all kinds of reasons.

But when the power goes out, businesses have to handle situations differently. And, each business is different. Those that are prepared have backup systems and procedures in place, most of which include generators. And this is true of many businesses and industries across the nation.

What industries use backup generators? You may be surprised that a multitude of businesses use backup generators to keep their operations running 24/7 – even when the power goes out. Here are a few examples of some industries that use generators along with the reasons why.

Hospitality/Tourism

When the power goes out, these types of businesses need to make sure their guests are safe at all times.

Hotels – heating, lights, elevators, security cameras, communication services
Resorts – restaurants, trams or gondolas, pool filtration and pumps
Amusement Parks – rides, food storage and prep, restrooms, payment services
Zoos – keeping cages locked, heating/cooling animal enclosures, keeping the lights on for guests
Ski Areas – snow production machines, ski lifts, heating lodges and buildings
Casinos – slot machines, cash machines, security cameras, communication systems

Food

When the power fails companies in this sector can’t afford to lose all of their products due to temperature and conditions. Distribution Centers – freezers, refrigerators, loading banks, computing systems
Bakeries/Catering Centers – ovens, packaging equipment
Restaurants – stoves, refrigerators, lights for patrons, payment stations and cash registers
Ice Cream Trucks – freezers, payment station
Seafood Facilities – freezer storage, temperature stability, communications

Government/State Services

When the power goes out, these services must still be available.

Garbage & Recycling – separation equipment, cleaning equipment, computers
Water Treatment – pumps, filtration systems, computers, communications
Schools/Universities – lights, computer systems and servers, libraries
Embassies – computer servers, security cameras and checkpoints, gated entrances

Telecommunications

The telephone is critical equipment in an emergency situation when people need immediate assistance.

Cell Phone Towers - almost every one has a standby generator on it

Switching Facilities - often have to run these with prime power in remote areas or during outages

Retail

magine getting stuck in a pitch black store?

Retailers must ensure that their customers, employees, and products are safe during a power failure.

Department Stores – lights, payment stations, security cameras
Car Dealerships – lights, computers, security cameras
Gas Stations – lights, pumps, payment services, security cameras

Entertainment

The show must go on. At a play, movies, or concert, the need for power is never ending.

Film Crews – cameras, lighting, microphones/sound computers
Concerts – lighting, sound boards, speakers, computers, ticket systems, payment systems
Events – ticketing systems, lights, communications, payment systems

Power Plants and Energy

To avoid running out of power modern power plants have generators installed for worst case scenarios.

Nuclear Power Plants - most have standby gensets installed for contingency plans
Wind Farms - for when the wind does not blow, many wind farms have backup generator sets in place
Solar Power Plants - for when the sun does not shine! Many solar installations use backup gensets
Renewable Energy Facilities & Microgrids - systems with combined renewables and energy storage often have gensets

Miscellaneous

There are all types of other companies that could potentially lose millions of dollars’ worth of products and services in just a few short hours of power loss. To avoid this worst case scenario, they utilize backup generators to keep production running seamlessly. This is just a handful of the types of businesses and industries that utilize backup generators to keep things running smoothly. If you’d like to learn more about industrial backup generators contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

How the Internet Kept Running During The Hurricanes

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 16, 2017
South Shore Generators in Wareham,MA

At one node of the industrial backbone that keeps the internet running, employees sheltered from the worst of Hurricane Irma in a stairwell of a seven-story building in downtown Miami. When the power had gone out, diesel generators instantly kicked in to keep the lights on and prevent the internet from going down.

In Houston, at another of these nodes, called data centers, Hurricane Harvey pushed waters so high that a live fish flopped in a loading dock, but the physical defenses held.

Yet another data center, west of Houston, was so well prepared for the storm — with backup generators, bunks and showers — that employees’ displaced family members took up residence and United States marshals used it as a headquarters until the weather passed.

“It wasn’t Noah’s ark, but it was darn close,” said Rob Morris, managing partner and co-founder of Skybox, the company that runs the center.

For all their seeming immateriality, the internet and the cloud rely on a vast industrial infrastructure consisting of data centers linked through a sprawling network of fiber optics. The facilities are stacked with servers — boxlike computers that crunch the data for everything from hospitals, law enforcement agencies and banks to news websites, email and weather reports — that cannot be without electricity and cooling for even a fraction of a second.

Yet even as millions of people lost power across Florida, and thousands of homes and businesses were flooded out in Miami and Texas, the heavy digital machinery at the heart of the internet and the cloud held firm.

Though the storm disabled some cellphone towers and local connections, the center never stopped processing and transmitting data. It lost utility power around 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 10, but supplied its own electricity with the generators.

When the storm eased and he walked outside, Mr. Eassey said, he immediately saw the effect that Digital Realty and other data centers had by keeping the servers going. “Everyone was talking on their phones, searching on their phones, and commerce that uses the internet to do their business was up and running,” he said.

A list of Digital Realty’s top customers shows why those operations are so important: Clients include IBM, Facebook, CenturyLink, Oracle, Yahoo, Morgan Stanley, AT&T and JPMorgan Chase, among others.

Inside the centers, the drill during a natural disaster can be overwhelming. One company, EdgeConneX, lost utility power for three days at a Miami data center, two days at a center in Jacksonville, Fla., and two days at an Atlanta location. But Rich Werner, director of operations at the company, said that backup generators turned on and service was never interrupted.

“Data center operations, to me, is 362 days of boredom,” Mr. Werner said. “And then you get these hurricanes coming through, and it’s three days of pulling your hair out.”

There are no legal standards for data centers unless they house servers for clients like government agencies, which require special protections.

But a professional organization, the Seattle-based Uptime Institute, rates the facilities on four tiers of resiliency for events like storms, earthquakes and run-of-the-mill power failures — possibly one reason the internet performed creditably during the hurricanes. The institute’s engineers “go to the site and pull the plug,” said Mark Harris, senior vice president of marketing, “and to be certified, it has to keep running.”

So when a hurricane or a tornado or an ice storm happens, the entire data center has been designed to withstand these external factors.

During Harvey and Irma, those measures seemed to work, said Doug Madory, director of internet analysis at Dyn, a web performance company with servers at a Miami data center. “I’m not aware of any core internet services going down,” he said.

Practically every single large oil and gas company in the world” operates servers in its data centers — an indication of how commerce of all kind relies on the facilities.

Depending on local conditions, some centers got off easier than others. In Houston facilities run by Data Foundry, automated systems worked so well that employees pooled resources and watched the Floyd Mayweather-Conor McGregor fight on pay-per-view.

Everyone in the business says that extensive preparation is critical.

The peak of the storm passed over the weekend, and when the power went out, the center was ready with diesel generators and a 10,500-gallon diesel tank on the site.

In Houston’s so-called energy corridor, the Skybox campus stayed above water. Utility power never went down. But the site was stocked with thousands of gallons of diesel fuel, as well as food and water, emergency medical kits, showers, bunk rooms and flares.

The site, which is a “modern-day fortress,” began hosting not only employees but several of their families, whose houses were flooded. Then the building doubled as an emergency response center for the United States marshals. Roughly 50 people used or stayed on the campus at one point or another during the storm.

If you want to keep your business up and running during the worst of weather, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: NY Times

When home improvements offer the most bang for your buck - Warenham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, August 27, 2015

Cleaning up on spring home improvement projects requires more effort than many homeowners anticipate.

Remodeling tends to pick up as the weather improves, and this year is no exception. During the second half of 2013, the National Association of Home Builders' Remodeling Market Index, which measures how busy contractors are, was at its highest level since the spring of 2004.

When the report was released in late January, remodelers were expecting an even busier spring, with more saying they had been called to bid on a job or were already committed to a project.

Which home improvement projects pay off?

If you're updating your home with the aim of adding to its value, tread carefully. Some improvements boost value more than others, and in most cases, a project costs more than it adds in value.

According to Remodeling magazine's 2014 Cost vs. Value report, the average portion of cost recouped is 66.1 percent. (Watch the video below for some of the projects, small and big, that provide good value.) Of course, what buyers will think of—and might pay for—an upgrade is less of a hurdle if you plan to enjoy your fancy new kitchen or master bath for years to come.

How much you can expect to spend varies not just by project, but also where you live. Location will have an impact on materials, labor costs and trends.

In New York City, the average living room revamp costs an average $19,297, according to home inspiration site Houzz.com's Real Cost Finder. In Portland, Ore., it's $11,573, and in Louisville, Ky., $7,995. Shopping around for a contractor—with care to find ones with positive referrals—can help cut the cost.

Shoppers who are DIY-ing smaller projects should also check for seasonal credit card rewards. Discover's quarterly bonus from April to June awards 5 percent back at home improvement stores. Over the same period, Citi Dividend offers 5 percent on home and garden stores in general and Home Depot specifically, and Chase Freedom, for Lowe's.

Watch out for the caps on rewards earned: Discover, for example, eliminates the bonus after $1,500 in qualified purchases, for a maximum rebate of $75. Still, that's like getting two gallons of paint for free.

One of the better returns on home projects is investing on backup generators. Find the best backup generator to your specific needs on-time and within your budget, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: Homes.Yahoo.com


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