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Factors Health Care Facilities Should Consider When Installing Emergency Power Generators

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 10, 2018
South Shore Generators - Generac Industrial Generators

Health care facilities managers must consider a number of factors when it comes to installing and using emergency power generators. When hospitals cannot maintain power, they place the lives of patients, employees and visitors at risk. Loss of communication is another concern, as is loss of key data. In addition, the impact of major weather events has shined a spotlight on a complex situation.

Moreover, as the health care industry moves to a hub-and-spoke model to provide more localized care, there is an increasing need for backup power at off-site facilities, thus ensuring that critical procedures are not interrupted in the event of a utility outage.

Government regulations are in place to make sure that off-site facilities have emergency power-generation equipment available, be it on a smaller scale. Ambulatory surgery centers are required by local and state codes to have emergency power. The same National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 110 standards apply to these locations as for a Level I trauma center. Emergency power must be available within 10 seconds to Life Safety and Critical Branch loads if a utility failure occurs. These same standards apply to some limited care and long-term care facilities.

Location, location, location

Generators, switchgear and fuel systems should only be installed in hospital locations where they are protected from inclement weather, floods, earthquakes and fire, according to Chisholm. This requirement rules out most basement and rooftop placements. Also, administrators must decide what services they are required to provide per agreements with other hospitals, state and local municipalities and for how long, in the case of an extended utility outage.

This could dictate the type of fueling system options (natural gas, diesel or a combination of both) and tight compliance with EPA Tier 4 regulations on the latest diesel engine designs. Contrary to popular belief, the newer natural gas- and propane-powered sets can be used on selected projects in several states.

Hospitals typically require multiple generators because of their size and the importance of power to overall operations. As a result, paralleling switchgear is important to meet their sequence of operation. Switchgear — tailored to specific needs — provides hospitals with the ability to control power for their existing load while ensuring that they’re covered for unforeseen events.

A key paragraph in NFPA 110 requires that hospitals restore power to essential life safety loads in 10 seconds or less.

Most technological advances in generator engine and alternator design during the past 10 years involve controls. The monitoring and controlling features of generators have allowed operators to understand and do much more with their units. The controllers also have increased the capability of onboard paralleling features to reduce the need for expensive switchgear.

The latest generator-set controllers from Kohler Power Systems are robust, intuitive and easy to use. They offer generator-set controllers to parallel and load manage different types of fuel systems. For example, paralleling a 500-kilowatt (kW) diesel generator with a 200-kW natural gas generator is a relatively simple process. Customers also have the ability to add different size generator sets to expand their system as their facilities grow.

There is more demand from hospitals for integrated emergency power systems from a single supplier — everything from the generator set to the paralleling switchgear/controls/automatic transfer switch to the uninterruptible power supply. There is also more interest in natural gas solutions for load management and cogeneration, which leverages waste heat from the generator-set package for facility heating or the production of chilled water.

More dual-fuel generator units, which run on diesel fuel and natural gas, are being used in hospitals. The big attraction of this technology is extended run times. The health care facility is able to enjoy the benefits that an endless fuel supply of natural gas brings without exposure to disruption that a utility connection brings. This approach also gives facilities managers the ability to maintain a smaller amount of on-site diesel fuel.

Dual-fuel sets actually can double the time a hospital stays on emergency power, experts agree. Also, if a natural gas connection is shut off, the generator can still run on full diesel, which makes for a win-win situation.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: hfmmagazine.com

Backup Power for Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities - Wareham, Boston, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 03, 2018
South Shore Generators - Back Up Power for Data Centers

Nursing Homes and Long-Term Care Facilities Need Low Maintenance Units

Diesel generators require constant care. With engine requirements for low-sulfur diesel fuel, the fuel now needs to be re-conditioned every 12-16 months to ensure stability and ease of flow. This fuel requirement, along with the maintenance of the exhaust after treatment system, requires an experienced facility manager to handle this process. If you do not have this person on staff, you would need to turn to a third-party provider for the service, which will add cost. It will also require the rental of a backup generator during servicing when not using a MPS solution.

To reduce the maintenance burden, many short and long-term care facilities are turning to natural gas generators, as they need little maintenance. They are also eco-friendly with fewer emissions and a smaller carbon foot print.

For more information on industrial generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: generac.com

Back Up Power for Hotels

Joseph Coupal - Monday, November 05, 2018
South Shore Generator - KOLHER Industrial Generator

Hospitality has Gone High Tech. Back Up Systems Have Too.

Not long ago, hospitality needs were simpler: nice room, clean sheets, more towels. Today expectations are much different, and they’re driving a huge need for next-generation backup power.

Whether traveling for business or leisure, hospitality guests expect fast, reliable Wi-Fi, digital reservation systems, mobile check-in, mobile concierge services and more. Add the emergence of new all-in-one entertainment complexes, and hospitality has become a whole new world.

Assessing Facility Needs

KOHLER provides the reliable backup power systems you need to ensure unforgettable experiences—and earn the positive reviews your business depends on. We assess key needs including:

  • Safety
  • Continued operations
  • Emissions
  • Noise containment

Power Considerations

Every hospitality facility needs to be ready to run without utility power in the case of severe weather, weakness in the grid or even construction accidents.

We know there's a lot to consider. That’s why we make it easy. Contact South Shore Generator today and we'll take care of you every step of the way.

kohlerpower.com

Back Up Generators for Data Centers and Financial Institutions

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 29, 2018
South Shore Generator - KOLHER Industrial Generator

Big data has changed the world. We generate 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily—data that businesses, governments and people depend on. Further fueled by mobile devices and data-on-demand business, there are ever-growing demands on service levels in data centers around the world. Cloud computing and the Internet of Things are driving 12 percent growth per year in the data center market. The expectations for peak performance and uninterruptible power have never been higher.

The data center market itself is changing too. Data centers are moving closer to their customers, colocating and adopting multitenant architecture more than ever before. Many are becoming smaller and more scalable. Tax and energy incentives are common, aimed at attracting data center investment while improving the operational efficiency of these critical facilities.

Managaing Energy Use and Costs

Data centers consume vast amounts of energy to keep online businesses running at maximum capacity around-the-clock. To avoid wasting much of the electricity pulled off the grid and to improve operational costs, data centers are being designed and built with higher levels of efficiency, measured in PUE (power usage effectiveness). Today, data center owners want more sustainable ways to power their facilities and lessen their carbon footprints. Assessing your center’s needs and designing a power system that’s modular and scalable will help you optimize uptime and availability, cut energy use and provide significant savings.

Assessing Facility Needs

A data center’s electrical power supply can be provided by several different circuits and supplemented by energy storage systems and generators. To provide a “No-Break” power supply (uninterruptible power with zero service interruptions), two independent power sources provide redundancy and risk reduction, rather than depend on a single source of inbound power.

Power Supply

Redundancy is an essential design feature built into a data center to provide a double layer of security. To prevent interruptions to the power supply, all components, including the emergency systems, are installed in duplicate with multiple generator sets.

Security

There is an essential need for protecting both the data center’s physical security and its cyber security. Redundant backup power is a critical component of a secure data center—and a requirement for recognition as a Tier IV data center.

Physical Environment

Maintaining precise, stable air conditioning and optimal control of environmental dust are two more factors creating larger loads and more dependence on backup generators.

Fire Prevention

Fires must be prevented, extinguished or controlled. An ultrasophisticated detection system that ensures maximum containment must be maintained on an uninterruptible power supply.

Power Considerations

Scalability

A larger-than-necessary power system that caters to possible unknowns will increase costs and diminish efficiency. The industry is seeing a shift to scalable data centers that start small and scale up to meet increased demands. This trend is even more evident in colocated and multitenant facilities that make up the majority of new data center construction. Colocating (sharing data center space but not servers) or multitenanting (sharing servers) helps businesses achieve cost savings and efficiency.

Secure, robust data storage requires a dependable and scalable power system—one that’s capable of delivering uninterruptible power and meeting demanding service requirements.

Uptime and Reliability

Designing power systems that meet the requirement for the highest levels of uptime, such as the Uptime Institute’s Tier IV standard, requires expert attention to system architecture and equipment redundancy. Getting the right combination of uninterrupted power supply and generator sets is crucial to meet tier classifications.

Modular Data Centers

The modular data center achieved by installing and enclosing two or more generators outdoors versus building oversized generators indoors is becoming more prevalent. Each generator set provides power to specific servers. “Swing” generators come online to provide backup power if one fails, offering an option to other paralleling equipment.

Edge Data Centers

The building of smaller data centers closer to users (those on the “edge” of large metropolitan markets) is becoming more common due to network latency, which limits the maximum rate that information can be transmitted. Edge data centers provide quick-and-agile response, faster access to data and an improved experience for businesses and people that are “always on.”

Redundancy

Redundancy is an essential design feature built into a data center to provide a layer of security, known as N+1 or 2N redundancy, with essential components duplicated in the event that one component fails. While a facility might install a single large generator to meet its power needs, paralleling two or more generators with paralleling switchgear offers practical benefits and advantages over a single-generator system.

Performance

Our reliable power systems play a major role in helping data centers prevent unnecessary financial loss and security breaches in the event of a power outage. The generator provides backup power within seconds of a break in the normal power supply. Generator sets should start providing backup power within seconds of a break in utility power supply, and transfer switches should provide seamless automatic switching between the electrical power from the utility and the backup power system.

End-to-End Management

From planning the design and selecting the equipment to testing and commissioning, we’re focused on delivering reliable, custom-designed power systems tailored to your specifications. Agile manufacturing, rigorous testing and careful commissioning assure you of a solution that fits your business—and your budget.

Customized Solutions

Your power system is customized, built and tested by a dedicated team of experienced applications engineers. They’ve designed power systems for hundreds of data centers and combine industry experience with Kohler’s agile manufacturing process to deliver your purpose-built solution.

For more information on generators for data and financial institutions, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: kohler.com

Backup Industrial Power Saves Lives at a Community Hospital

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 15, 2018
South Shore Generators - Generac Industrial Generators

There’s no business more important than providing health and patient care. In southwestern Michigan, the Community Hospital of Watervliet serves more than a dozen communities. As one of the primary hospitals in this area, it is responsible for offering routine and emergency health care around the clock, 365 days a year.

The hospital employs approximately 350 people and offers a broad array of inpatient and outpatient services. The four-story building, constructed in 1979, includes approximately 65 beds for patients, as well as an emergency room, surgical suite, critical care unit, birthing center, radiology lab, and rehabilitation center. A ground level heliport is located near the emergency room for critical care patients needing helicopter transport.

To ensure that their facility will have full power in the event of a utility outage, the hospital’s board of directors invested in a 750 kW Gemini® Twin Pack genset from Generac Power Systems. This diesel-powered unit is actually two 375 kW generators in one enclosure, designed to operate in parallel. This dual genset arrangement provides built-in redundancy and twice the reliability of a traditional single engine generator, since each genset backs up the other. If one is undergoing maintenance or doesn’t operate for some reason, the second genset will provide coverage of the load up to 375 kW, which is sufficient for all of the hospital’s critical load, as well as most of its operations.

The system was installed by a local electrical contractor with experience in connecting standby power equipment. They coordinated the connection work with the local utility and integrated the generator with the hospital’s uninterrupted power supply (UPS) battery system.

Once the new genset was in place, it wasn’t long before it was called into service. “We actually ran the entire hospital on the generator for more than three hours while the utility changed transformers in our area,” Don Englehardt says. “The system has also worked well during a few short outages we’ve had since it was installed.”

For every hospital, backup power is imperative, ensuring that emergency and life safety systems will remain fully operational anytime utility power is lost. But a reliable and redundant backup system also provides tremendous peace of mind to hospital administrators and facility managers.

“In the event of a major outage, we’re fully prepared,” Englehardt notes. “With the fuel we have on-site, the generators can operate for the better part of a week without interruption, powering the entire hospital. This system gives us much more flexibility than the one it replaced. Our administrative team and the hospital’s board of directors were visionary in initiating the purchase of this equipment for the well-being of our patients and staff.”

For more information on industrial power for community hospitals and health care centers, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: generac.com

Industrial Power for a Backup Power Solution: A University Case Study

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 08, 2018

To protect their employees and expansive data center, the University of Utah turned to Generac Industrial Power for a backup power solution that could safeguard their infrastructure, fit in a limited space and meet their strict budgeting needs.

Watch the video below.


For more information on industrial back up power for education, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: generac.com

Backup Power for Educational Facilities

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, September 11, 2018
South Shore Generators - Generac Natural Gas Generators

Generac Makes the Learning Curve Easy for Educational Facilities Requiring Backup Power

Educational facilities can face weather events, grid failures, or potential threats from outside parties. Power outages can cripple schools with impacts on class schedules, as well as the potential for data loss and critical equipment damage. For universities, this could mean losing thousands of dollars and countless hours of student and faculty time should heating/cooling units preserving grant-based experiments become inoperable.

Even elementary and secondary schools have fire alarms, phone systems, and computer networks that may need protection from a backup generator in case of a power outage. In addition, many educational buildings are used as fall-out shelters, so backup power is needed for emergency lighting to ensure safe passage for everyone in the building.

Power Up with MPS

With so much at stake, many educational facilities are relying on high kW generators to provide the standby/emergency power needed. These generators can ensure the heating, cooling, ventilation, refrigeration, security, and elevator systems can continue to work. These capabilities allow a school to continue functioning until normal power is restored.

Generac’s inventive Modular Power System (MPS) for paralleling generators offers educational facilities the power, redundancy, scalability, and safety required. The MPS approach does not require dedicated third-party switchgear. Future expansion generators simply tie directly to the generator bus. Because the paralleling is already built into the generator, the Generac MPS system inherently has greater flexibility for growth, requires less electrical room space, and reduces initial capital cost.

With Generac’s MPS system, the generators do not have to be next to each other to be paralleled. Many universities are using separate gensets located inside/outside different campus buildings to ensure safety from potential threats and maintain smooth operation.

In addition, the MPS allows you to combine fuel options: diesel, natural gas, or even bi-fuel. This not only gives you the benefits of genset redundancy, you also have fuel redundancy. Natural gas relies on a strong underground pipeline network that is rarely impacted by weather. Win-win.

Reduced Maintenance Natural Gas Generator Solutions

Natural gas generators are also becoming the preferred solution for many secondary and elementary schools as they do not typically have dedicated facility managers on staff. Natural gas generators require much less maintenance, while diesel generators need to have the fuel re-conditioned every 12-16 months, requiring either a skilled maintenance person or a third-party vendor to perform this task.

Natural gas generators also provide:

  • much longer runtimes
  • easier permitting
  • 90% fewer emissions compared to diesel generators

Generac is the expert in natural gas generators: with two Frost and Sullivan “Company of the Year” Awards and a recent Consulting Specifying Engineer (CSE) award for our 500 kW gaseous generators.

Take the Fear Out of Medium Voltage Generator Systems

With the vast needs for more power at educational facilities, medium voltage applications with a medium voltage alternator and ANSI C37.20.2 gear are becoming specified. At the same time, many staff members can be hesitant to work with medium voltage systems. The solution—our integrated paralleling MPS concept.

By paralleling on the low voltage side and feeding one or multiple transformers, various system advantages can be realized:

  • facility staff are typically more comfortable interacting with low voltage generators
  • flow voltage equipment is much easier and quicker to source
  • flow voltage rental equipment can be used when needed
  • fno medium voltage paralleling switch-gear sections are required resulting in a smaller footprint and significant cost savings

Generac Understands the Needs of Education Facilities

While every educational facility has different needs, we know the protection of students, staff, and visitors is principal. At the same time, maintaining the privacy of personal data and the preservation of valuable research experiments is vital. With more than five decades of experience, Generac can provide the solutions you need. Our wide variety of sizes, fuel choices, and configurations allows facility managers, engineers, and contractors to make the selections that provide the best value, while meeting your kW requirements.

South Shore Generator provides support during every part of the process from sizing to specifications to design and installation. We remove the learning curve entirely with proven products. Contact us.

Generac.com

Emergency Power Generators Provide the Backup Power Small Businesses Need

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 05, 2018
South Shore Generators - Back Up Power for Data Centers

In the U.S., “what-if” power outage scenarios are becoming “when-if” scenarios. Between 2000 and 2013, there were an average of 200 reported power grid outages per year, which does not include the plethora of weather-related outages or accidental outages, which can be caused by animals or human error during a construction project.

We understand that small businesses drive our economy today. And, frankly, we don’t consider any business to be “small” because so much is at stake—your brand’s reputation, your staff’s livelihoods, not to mention your significant investments in equipment, electronics, facilities, and inventory.

No matter what your need, back up industrial generators can protect your business from the damage of power outages. You can rely upon standby generators to protect your bottom line and give you an edge over the competition, with the best power for small business.

Industrial Power Offers Many Choices

Generac offers a variety of small business power solutions—from easy to maintain small kW natural gas generators ideal for convenience stores, warehouses, and offices—to large multi-megawatt paralleled solutions to ensure that your larger business runs smoothly.

When you start your business, every capital investment you make is critical. Generac’s innovative Modular Power System (MPS) can provide the needed initial kWs of power along with the benefits of redundancy, scalability, and safety, through integrated paralleling.

Since paralleling is built into the generators, the MPS system allows for growth, requires less space, and reduces your initial capital cost.

The costs to specify and install two lower kW paralleled versus one larger kW are quite similar. This makes choosing Generac’s MPS a smart decision for all types of and sizes of businesses.

Fuel Choices to Meet Emissions Concerns

On-site diesel fuel has been the traditional choice for standby power. At the same time, Generac manufactures generators that run on natural gas and liquid propane (LP) fuel, providing reduced emissions and maintenance, compared to diesel.

We also offer pioneering bi-fuel generators, which start on diesel and transition to natural gas as load is applied, providing significantly longer runtimes with less diesel fuel storage. This allows you to choose the standby power system that is the best fit for your business.

At South Shore Generator we can provide guidance on our durable and dependable gensets, as well as give advice about working with local codes and your local AHJs. For more information, contact us.

Source: generac.com

New Generac 625 Kw Gaseous Unit Designed To Compete Favorably With Diesel Nodes

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, March 08, 2018
South Shore Generator - 625 Kw Gaseous Unit in Wareham, MA

As the leader in spark-ignited power generation, Generac Industrial Power has introduced its largest gaseous gen-set node: the 625 kW unit. Available in single-set or MPS configurations, the 625 kW gen-set is designed for demand response applications as well as emergency standby for data centers, commercial and industrial facilities, healthcare applications, infrastructure projects and the like.

The 625 kW generator is driven by Generac’s new 33.9 L spark-ignited engine. Engineered from a proven diesel block, it is the first engine to utilize fuel and spark systems from the company’s recent Motortech acquisition. The result is a larger-displacement platform with high power density — a strong competitor to the performance of diesel platforms.

The 33.9 L engine was also designed for high load acceptance and fast transient response, capable of meeting NFPA 110 Type 10 start-time requirements. It has been optimized for use in a wide range of temperatures, from a high of 122 degrees F down to -20 degrees F with a winterization kit.

The engine is U.S. EPA certified at the factory for stationary emergency operations. For demand response applications, it is factory certified for stationary non-emergency operation.

Unique to the 625 kW machine is Generac’s new Power Zone® control system. Designed by Generac specifically for its industrial power systems, the Power Zone controller is the first on the market with built-in Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and LAN connections, putting monitoring and control within easy reach of any mobile device or PC.

The Power Zone’s on-board 7-in. color resistive touchscreen provides instance access to generator and engine parameters, ensuring the unit is ready and available at a moment’s notice. The interface was designed with intuitive icons as well as app-like navigation.

The Power Zone controller also controls all paralleling functions when the generator is used in an MPS configuration. No additional system or master controller is required. Communication between generators is performed with an industry-first redundant Ethernet. A permissive and load-shed assembly is available for MPS applications to sequence multiple transfer switches.

The 625 kW unit is designed to run on natural gas fuel only. It is available as either an open set or with one of three enclosure types: weather protected, Level 1 sound attenuated or Level 2 sound attenuated.

The generator is available for quoting and ordering now, and will be available to ship in the beginning of Q2 2018.

For more information on Gas Generator sets, contact South Shore Generator.

Gas Generator Sets Ratings

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 26, 2018
South Shore Generator - KD Industrial Generator Series Expands in Wareham, MA

Generator set ratings are guidelines to help size the unit to meet the load requirements of the application. There are three common industry generator set ratings for gas generator sets: standby, prime and continuous. Each manufacturer, however, may have different engine tolerances that affect the engine and/or generator set ratings. When choosing a rating for generator sets installed within the United States, the U.S. EPA emission standards for stationary emergency and non-emergency engines must also be considered.

Standby-Rated Gas Generator Sets

Suitable for stationary emergency applications where the generator set serves as the secondary power source when the primary utility power source fails. The EPA allows for a maximum of 100 hours of operation annually on either pipeline natural gas or propane fuel sources for maintenance checks and readiness testing.

In these applications, the standby rating is typically specified at a 0.8 power factor. This rating is applicable to variable loads with an average load factor at a percentage of the standby nameplate rating.

Prime-Rated Gas Generator Sets

Suitable for stationary non-emergency applications where the generator set serves as either the primary or secondary power source when connected to an unreliable utility power source. Prime-rated gas generator sets are typically used for either peak shaving or to provide interruptible power when required by the utility. They can also serve as a secondary power source upon utility failure.

In these applications, the prime rating is typically specified at a 0.8 power factor. This rating is applicable to variable loads with an average load factor at a percentage of the prime nameplate rating for an EPA-allowable unlimited amount of total operation hours.

Continuous-Rated Gas Generator Sets

Suitable for paralleling with utility applications where the generator set serves as the primary power source. They typically cannot operate as a secondary power source upon utility failure due to their limited transient response capabilities.

In these applications, the continuous rating is typically specified at a 1.0 power factor. The load factor allows the generator set to be operated at full load for an EPA allowable unlimited amount of total operational hours.

For more information on Gas Generator sets, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: resources.kohler.com


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