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2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
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CALL US 888-339-4248

Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

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KD Industrial Generator Series Expands

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 16, 2018
South Shore Generator - KD Industrial Generator Series Expands in Wareham, MA

When the KD Series large diesel industrial generators were unveiled in October of 2016, KOHLER and KOHLER-SDMO also announced the planned expansion for the new line, which would eventually grow to encompass generators as large as 4200kVA (50Hz) and 4000kW (60Hz). Today, based on strong worldwide response to the initially-launched models – utilizing KOHLER’s own diesel engines ranging from 800kVA/800kW to 2800kVA/2500kW – KOHLER and KOHLER-SDMO are proud to officially expand the KD Series with the rollout of several new generators ranging up to 3500kVA/3250kW.

The first wave of KD Series generators really resonated with key influencers in the data center, healthcare, telecommunications and water-treatment segments around the world. Now KOHLER can providing these users – and many others – with additional KOHLER-powered options that will deliver a similar mix of durability, fuel efficiency, and the many other benefits that have helped the KD Series to stand out in this competitive global category.

The newest KD Series diesel industrial generators are powered by two new compact and powerful KOHLER V16 engine models. The KD36V16 is a 16-cylinder engine with 36-liter displacement, which will power the 60Hz KD1250 and KD1350 as well as the 50Hz KD1250, KD1400, and KD1500. The other new engine is the KD83V16, a 16-cylinder model with 83-liter displacement, which will power the 60Hz KD2800, KD3000, and KD3250 as well as the 50Hz KD3100, KD3300, and KD3500. Both engine models deliver highly efficient and dependable performance and feature a modular design for optimal serviceability.

KD Series – Global Success Stories

The KD Series large diesel industrial generators have been selected by key decision makers in numerous industries worldwide, including the data center and healthcare segments. A few initial success stories are highlighted below.

Data Centers:

22 KD1600 generators were selected for a large data center in Ashburn, Virginia (USA). The complex will encompass six buildings with more than 245,000 square feet and 16 megawatts of critical IT load.

11 KD1800 generators were selected by a UK-based data center. The center is owned by a Japanese telecom company, which selected the KD Series based on the low emissions of the new line.

Healthcare:

Two KD1800 generators were selected to provide backup power to a major hospital in France. The generators are placed in ISO20 Super Silent containers and will ensure critical systems in the hospital’s many operating rooms maintain power during unplanned outages.

For additional information about the new KOHLER and KOHLER-SDMO large diesel industrial generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: KOHLER.com

Cold Weather Generator Operation

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, January 02, 2018
South Shore Generators - Generac Natural Gas Generators

Diesel generators are notoriously problematic during cold weather. Not only does diesel fuel become unstable in cold temperatures but when the engine block and heads are cold, they absorb the heat of the compression required to ignite diesel fuel.

When generators used for standby or continuous power will be operated at 32°F (0°C) or below – especially for extended periods of time – operators must take precautions to ensure the generator will start reliably, get to the desired load quickly, and continue to run without incident and unnecessary stress and wear on the engine.

Although fuel additives and other intermittent measures have long been common for generators, there is also a wide variety of purpose-built equipment that protects generators and their components against the cold. Some specialized add-ons keep the engine block warm; others keep coldsensitive equipment such as batteries and control boxes operating at the optimal temperature. This equipment is especially important where generators are being used in remote environments without any oversight by technicians or other company staff.

This blog looks at some of the equipment that can help companies protect their generator investments and ensure reliable startup and operation. It also offers a few pointers on selecting a provider to source generators and engines that are properly equipped for extremely cold weather use.

Battery warmers

Battery warmers enclose generator batteries in a thermal wrap, keeping the battery at a constant 80°F (27°C), the optimal temperature for maximum cold-cranking amps. Battery warmers should have durable, fire-retardant covers that resist oils and acids.

Thermostats, if available, can eliminate battery damage from possible overheating and subsequent acid spillage. Battery warmers prolong battery life and can boost cranking power by as much as 75 percent.

Block heaters

Block heaters, which are installed on the coolant circuit, keep the engine’s coolant warm enough that the unit is able to start immediately and attain/maintain the required engine load. They are generally powered by an external power source rather than the generator engine itself.

Hydronic coolant heaters

Hydronic coolant heaters gradually raise the temperature of the engine’s coolant, assuring even heating of the engine block. They enable generators to have warm starts, which reduce engine stress and wear, and reduce demand on the battery. Hydronic coolant heaters work independently of the engine, yet they tap into the fuel and power supplies of the engine. This approach eliminates the need for an external power or fuel source, which enables them to operate anywhere a generator could be located.

Control panel box heaters

For enclosed generators, cold weather operation brings another peril: condensation due to the differential between the external temperature and the temperature inside a heated enclosure.

These heaters keep the control box at an even temperature, preventing the condensation that can damage sensitive electronic parts.

Louvres

Louvres (also called dampers or shutters) open and close based on a specific trigger, eliminating both overcooling and overheating by regulating the amount of ambient airflow through the generator engine’s radiator.

Louvres can be thermostat activated, in which case a thermostat is installed inside the generator enclosure and an electronic switch triggers their operation when temperatures rise above a preset threshold. Electronic louvres such as these should always include electronic stall protection.

Louvres can also be hydraulic, being driven directly by the temperature of the engine’s coolant. Coolant-driven louvres open gradually, allowing the engine to cool effectively but preventing a sudden influx of cold air that could cause the temperature inside the generator enclosure to drop precipitously.

Hydraulic louvres are a preferred option in extremely cold climates because they do not contain sensitive electronic parts that are prone to seizing and failing in cold weather. Both types of louvres should also be able to prevent snow intrusion into the unit.

Snow hoods

Snow hoods are specialized coverings designed to prevent snow from accumulating inside the generator enclosure. Some manufacturers can relocate the generator’s air exhaust when they install snow hood kits, further preventing snow intrusion into the exhaust pipe without restricting air flow.

Final thoughts

When a generator is needed to supply power, there may not be much time for warm-up. A cold pack (winter pack) is a proven solution for ensuring generators can start without a long warm-up time and stay running dependably at temperatures ranging from 32°F to -50°F (0°C to -46°C). Depending on the situation and condition of the generator itself, this equipment can reduce the incidence of generator failure in cold conditions by 50 percent or more. For more information on industrial generators and sub-zero temperatures, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: oilandgasproductnews.com

Industrial Generators: Purchase and Installation

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 11, 2017
South Shore Generator - Industrial Generators in Wareham, MA

IBHS recommends retaining an expert with extensive experience with all types of generators to assist with choosing the design and installation of the right generator; specific attention should be paid to the applications required to meet your business needs.

IBHS offers the following guidelines to help you with this process:

Use local contractors, and ask for recommendations and references. Consult with several contractors in-person prior to making a decision.

Make sure the chosen expert helps select the right size generator for your needs. This will include a determination of wattage needs (constant and start-up) and voltage ratings. You also should make sure that whatever generator is chosen is rated to provide power at a frequency of 60 hertz.

Obtain all estimates in writing; including specifics about the work to be performed and the contractor’s license information.

Ask for proof of insurance, for both the manufacturer of the generator and the contractor, as well as a written warranty from the manufacturer and a guarantee from the contractor.

Include the manufacturer and the contractor on the suppliers/vendor forms in your Open for Business® or other business continuity plan.

There may be local codes that require permits and inspections of plans and installation practices. Additionally, any generator transfer switch should be installed by a licensed electrician in order to comply with the National Electrical Code (NEC) as outlined in the National Fire Protection Association Publication No. 72. Some states also have safety regulations designed to prevent “back feed” (see below).

Be sure the contractor walks you through the operations and maintenance processes of the generator. You should also be given all of the operational manuals provided by the manufacturer for reference.

Testing, maintenance and operations

Most emergency generator failures are typically caused by poor testing and maintenance practices. Testing of permanently installed generators should include simulating a real power failure. This practice will test the transfer switch’s function and the generator at the same time.

Please note: Only running the generator will not test the transfer switch’s function, which is a critical element to proper operation during power outage.

Regularly scheduled testing and maintenance of emergency generator equipment is essential to ensure peak performance when you need it most. Maintenance contracts with third parties are a good way to make sure your system achieves prime performance.

Generators — portable or permanently installed — require the use of fuel. Diesel fuel is more prone to oxidation than gasoline, and should never be stored for longer than 12 months. If there are plans to store fuel, a fuel stabilizer should be added.

Many generators use fuel filters to prevent impurities from clogging the fuel lines. Fuel filters should be maintained in accordance with the equipment manufacturers’ recommendations to prevent this problem.

Proper coolant level is critical to the operation of a generator. Check coolant levels prior to start up and monthly for maintenance.

Like any engine, a generator uses oil. Use the right type of oil, maintain the proper oil level and change the oil when it appears dirty.

Check that all air vents or louvers are in good condition, free of dirt and debris, and, if required, that they move freely during operation.

Visually inspect the condition of all hoses, gaskets and gauges to ensure these are free of cracks and operational without leaks.

At start up, check that operating pressures and temperatures are stable and within the manufacturers design parameters.

Also, when the engine is running, check for unusual engine noise and knocking. If there are any unusual sounds, turn the generator off and have it inspected by a professional.

Maintain a log of all test operations and record all readings.

In the event of an impending storm that could result in power outages, test the generator system and top off all liquids at the conclusion of the test.

Do not tamper with safety devices or attempt to repair the generator unless you are a qualified service person.

The total electrical load on your generator should never exceed the manufacturer’s rating.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: disastersafety.org

Industrial Generators for Business Preparedness Planning

Joseph Coupal - Monday, November 27, 2017
South Shore Generator - Generac MPS

Generators are an integral part of the preparedness planning process for businesses of every size and can greatly reduce business disruption when normal power is interrupted.

Power outages resulting from unpredictable weather, man-made or natural disasters, or site-specific events can disrupt your business operations. Below is segments of a comprehensive disaster planning tool to assist you in reducing the potential for loss and recovering quickly should a disaster strike, no matter what the cause. One important consideration as you develop your business continuity plan is the purchase, operation and maintenance of a generator. This fall-back tool enables you to continue operating some or all of your electronic equipment and lights and minimize business interruptions. This article will provide basic information about generators; however it is not intended to be a comprehensive guide for using generators. Always consult the manufacturer’s instructions for complete information. Generators are an integral part of the preparedness planning process for businesses of every size and can greatly reduce business disruption when normal power is interrupted. At the same time, using a generator poses certain risks that must be addressed for safe operation, including fire, damage to electrical equipment, and even injury or death to those operating the generator or working in the building where it is being used. Proper ventilation is a critical element for reducing the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning from a generator’s engine exhaust.

In addition to safety concerns, proper maintenance is critical to avoid the failure of a generator when it’s needed most. The time to maintain a generator is well before a major storm or disaster strikes; when professional assistance may be unavailable, power lines are down, and access roads are blocked. To gain the greatest business continuity benefits, while minimizing associated risks, it’s important to purchase a generator that is properly designed and sized for your business needs. Once purchased and properly installed, put procedures in place to ensure regular maintenance and that all safe operating practices are followed. Business and building owners should always operate and maintain generators in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations.

Choosing a generator and related supplies

Before purchasing an electrical power generator, consider what electrical equipment that must be operable when normal power is interrupted. Other considerations include:

  • How often does the business lose power and for how long?
  • What are the most likely sources of power outages?

OFB-EZ will help you to identify the events that could interrupt business operations. These factors will help to determine the size and type of generator to buy.

One threshold question facing the business owner is whether to purchase a portable or back-up generator, or to choose a permanent or stand-by generator. A portable generator is a relatively small machine, which is usually rated no higher than 15 kilowatts and 240 volts, and is intended to be moved and activated for temporary use at a location where utility-supplied electric power is not available. A standby generator, in contrast, is a back-up electrical system that is permanently installed and may operate automatically through the use of a transfer switch, which senses a power loss, commands the generator to start, and then transfers the selected electrical load to the generator.

In the next post we’ll discuss portable and permanent industrial generators. For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: disastersafety.org

The Use of Natural Gas Generators, Is Natural Gas or Diesel More Acceptable in MA?

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 23, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac Natural Gas Generators

Generac Industrial Power recently attended the 2017 NFPA conference in Boston, Mass. to discuss the use of natural gas generators in emergency system applications with the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) community.

The reliability of natural gas as fuel for emergency generator applications tends to create interesting discussions within the market. As the standard for standby power generation, NFPA 110, has plenty to say about reliability concerns and best practices relative to adequately maintaining on-site diesel. However, it provides little guidance for the acceptance of natural gas reliability. The National Electric Code (NEC) article 700.12(B)(3) states: “Prime movers shall not be solely dependent on a public utility gas system for their fuel supply - except: ‘Where acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, the use of other than on-site fuels shall be permitted where there is a low probability of a simultaneous failure of both the off-site fuel delivery system and power from the outside electrical utility company.’”

So what is reliable enough? According to a 2013 report by Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Lincoln Laboratory, natural gas distribution systems operate at a reliability rate exceeding 99.999 percent, with the exception of seismically active areas. Incidentally, that makes the natural gas distribution system approximately one thousand times more reliable than a single-engine generator set, which is typically assumed to be 99 percent reliable. To probe these questions, Generac surveyed 110 attendees at the NFPA show with three questions:

Is natural gas acceptable in your area?

The first asked if natural gas was an acceptable fuel for emergency system applications in their jurisdiction. Sixty-four percent replied yes; another 25 percent was uncertain. This illustrated a very high acceptance rate that mirrors the explosive growth in natural gas generators documented by Frost and Sullivan – 38 percent of the total North American market revenue is now natural gas generators, which is up from 28 percent only three years prior.

Who dictates acceptance? What guidelines exist?

The second question asked who determines if natural gas is an acceptable fuel for emergency systems and whether there are guidelines for accepting or rejecting this continuous fuel source. To this question, the respondents identified AHJ & fire marshal by 36 percent, but 43 perecent were uncertain. None of the respondents provided guidance regarding guidelines for acceptance. This highlights some of the challenges that are created when the code uses subjective language and provides little guidance regarding reliability. To that end, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) created a guideline regarding the evaluation of natural gas generators for nursing homes. The reliability of a natural gas fuel source can be proven with a letter from the natural gas vendor that contains the following:

  • A statement that the fuel source is reasonably reliable
  • A description supporting the assertion that the source is reasonably reliable
  • A statement of the low likelihood of an interruption
  • A description supporting the assertion that the likelihood of interruption is low
  • A signature from technical personnel

Similar processes, which leverage a letter from the local gas utility, are often utilized by the AHJ community when natural gas reliability is perceived as questionable within the market. Another method for determining reliability may leverage the guidance given for determining electric utility reliability in fire pump applications. NFPA 20 A.9.3.2 defines reliable as not having experienced any shutdowns longer than four continuous hours in the year prior to planning. This standard does not require the utility source to be infallible; it only requires a utility source free from routine outages. Using these criteria, most natural gas systems across the United States should be deemed reliable.

What is your personal perception of natural gas?

The last question focused on each attendee’s personal perception of natural gas reliability. Fifty-five percent of the respondents felt natural gas was favorable to diesel with 38 percent uncertain. This relatively high perception of natural gas reliability is influenced by personal experiences with hurricanes Irene and Sandy, both of which destroyed the long-standing conventional wisdom that diesel fuel delivery was assured even during the most severe emergencies. Both storms caused enough damage to the petroleum supply networks, making refueling requirements a challenge. Hurricane Sandy devastated fuel terminals across the Northeast. Even if a delivery truck was able to get to a terminal, it was unlikely it would be able to obtain fuel. The available fuel and trucks within the region were often redirected by the government to hospitals and targeted emergency response facilities.

It is incorrect to conclude that diesel fuel, simply by its on-site presence, is more reliable than natural gas. A reliable fuel supply is one that is consistently available in sufficient quantity and quality to ensure reliable emergency power. It is necessary to holistically examine external factors influencing the relative reliability of natural gas and diesel.

The Boston NFPA conference allowed Generac a great opportunity to explore these topics directly with a cross section of the AHJ community. These insights help illustrate that natural gas acceptance continues to grow within markets that have an established natural gas infrastructure. In these markets, the resulting awareness and acceptance of natural gas-fueled emergency generators is quite high.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: generac.com

How the Internet Kept Running During The Hurricanes

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 16, 2017
South Shore Generators in Wareham,MA

At one node of the industrial backbone that keeps the internet running, employees sheltered from the worst of Hurricane Irma in a stairwell of a seven-story building in downtown Miami. When the power had gone out, diesel generators instantly kicked in to keep the lights on and prevent the internet from going down.

In Houston, at another of these nodes, called data centers, Hurricane Harvey pushed waters so high that a live fish flopped in a loading dock, but the physical defenses held.

Yet another data center, west of Houston, was so well prepared for the storm — with backup generators, bunks and showers — that employees’ displaced family members took up residence and United States marshals used it as a headquarters until the weather passed.

“It wasn’t Noah’s ark, but it was darn close,” said Rob Morris, managing partner and co-founder of Skybox, the company that runs the center.

For all their seeming immateriality, the internet and the cloud rely on a vast industrial infrastructure consisting of data centers linked through a sprawling network of fiber optics. The facilities are stacked with servers — boxlike computers that crunch the data for everything from hospitals, law enforcement agencies and banks to news websites, email and weather reports — that cannot be without electricity and cooling for even a fraction of a second.

Yet even as millions of people lost power across Florida, and thousands of homes and businesses were flooded out in Miami and Texas, the heavy digital machinery at the heart of the internet and the cloud held firm.

Though the storm disabled some cellphone towers and local connections, the center never stopped processing and transmitting data. It lost utility power around 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 10, but supplied its own electricity with the generators.

When the storm eased and he walked outside, Mr. Eassey said, he immediately saw the effect that Digital Realty and other data centers had by keeping the servers going. “Everyone was talking on their phones, searching on their phones, and commerce that uses the internet to do their business was up and running,” he said.

A list of Digital Realty’s top customers shows why those operations are so important: Clients include IBM, Facebook, CenturyLink, Oracle, Yahoo, Morgan Stanley, AT&T and JPMorgan Chase, among others.

Inside the centers, the drill during a natural disaster can be overwhelming. One company, EdgeConneX, lost utility power for three days at a Miami data center, two days at a center in Jacksonville, Fla., and two days at an Atlanta location. But Rich Werner, director of operations at the company, said that backup generators turned on and service was never interrupted.

“Data center operations, to me, is 362 days of boredom,” Mr. Werner said. “And then you get these hurricanes coming through, and it’s three days of pulling your hair out.”

There are no legal standards for data centers unless they house servers for clients like government agencies, which require special protections.

But a professional organization, the Seattle-based Uptime Institute, rates the facilities on four tiers of resiliency for events like storms, earthquakes and run-of-the-mill power failures — possibly one reason the internet performed creditably during the hurricanes. The institute’s engineers “go to the site and pull the plug,” said Mark Harris, senior vice president of marketing, “and to be certified, it has to keep running.”

So when a hurricane or a tornado or an ice storm happens, the entire data center has been designed to withstand these external factors.

During Harvey and Irma, those measures seemed to work, said Doug Madory, director of internet analysis at Dyn, a web performance company with servers at a Miami data center. “I’m not aware of any core internet services going down,” he said.

Practically every single large oil and gas company in the world” operates servers in its data centers — an indication of how commerce of all kind relies on the facilities.

Depending on local conditions, some centers got off easier than others. In Houston facilities run by Data Foundry, automated systems worked so well that employees pooled resources and watched the Floyd Mayweather-Conor McGregor fight on pay-per-view.

Everyone in the business says that extensive preparation is critical.

The peak of the storm passed over the weekend, and when the power went out, the center was ready with diesel generators and a 10,500-gallon diesel tank on the site.

In Houston’s so-called energy corridor, the Skybox campus stayed above water. Utility power never went down. But the site was stocked with thousands of gallons of diesel fuel, as well as food and water, emergency medical kits, showers, bunk rooms and flares.

The site, which is a “modern-day fortress,” began hosting not only employees but several of their families, whose houses were flooded. Then the building doubled as an emergency response center for the United States marshals. Roughly 50 people used or stayed on the campus at one point or another during the storm.

If you want to keep your business up and running during the worst of weather, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: NY Times

Generator Solutions for the Telecommunications Industry

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, October 10, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac Telecommunication Industry Generators

The Power to protect your bottom line

For more than 50 years, Generac’s main focus has been providing dependable backup power solutions. And for the last three decades, we have deployed tens of thousands of standby power products to telecommunications installations around the world. As the experts in standby power for the telecommunications industry, many of the largest telecommunications companies rely on Generac to protect their revenue streams and profitability by backing up their infrastructures—including cell sites, data centers, back haul, and hubs—and safeguarding their customers’ experience.

Save on Ownership

Engineered on-site at our vertically integrated manufacturing facilities, Generac standby power systems reduce your total cost of ownership with innovative, space-saving designs. Like single-sided access to maintenance points and controls that significantly reduce the overall generator footprint and save considerably on space leasing costs. And integrated load centers that combine the distribution panel, controls, and transfer switch into a single unit for reduced installation costs and additional space

Enjoy 24/7/365 Support

Get product and technical support from one of the largest factory-certified service organizations in the industry—more than 1500 strong across North America. Dealers who maintain large inventories of Generac parts, components, and accessories to service units in all locations, no matter how remote.

Benefit from Short Lead Times

Customers seek out Generac because we offer some of the fastest delivery times in the industry. We work with our customers to develop rapid deployment programs that cut lead times to less than half of the industry standard. With a 98% on-time delivery rate.

Choose from a Broad Product Line

Generac offers the broadest line of gaseous and diesel-fueled generators in the industry—each of which is custom-configured for your specific application. All major components are designed and manufactured by Generac. The heavy-duty engines we use have proven their performance and reliability in telecommunications applications. And Generac has revolutionized gaseous-fueled generators with advances in technology that make them more powerful and cost-effective—even in large kilowatt applications.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: gens.generac.com

New Kohler Portable Generator Allows You to Select From 3 Different Fuel Types

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 02, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Pro7.5e portable generator

Expanding the company’s alternative fuels offering, KOHLER is introducing a Tri-Fuel Conversion Kit. Designed to pair with KOHLER’s new PRO9.0 portable generator, the kit enables the PRO9.0 to run on three different fuel types: gasoline, propane or natural gas. Users have the flexibility to select between the three fuel options by swapping out the fuel hose and simply turning a dial.

The tri-fuel portable generator is a great new option because it provides the convenience of three-in- one functionality. The PRO9.0 can be quickly adjusted to run on different fuels, based on fuel availability or a user’s individual preference. Propane and natural gas are sometimes selected due to the reduced emissions and run-time cost savings that those fuels can deliver.

South Shore Generator can quickly configure the new PRO9.0 portable generator with the Tri-Fuel Conversion Kit, while maintaining the product’s original warranty. Like other KOHLER portable generators, the PRO9.0 is backed by a premium three-year warranty and the company also offers a free loaner unit – through participating dealers – for any warranty repairs exceeding 24 hours.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: power.kohler.com

Factors to Consider When Installing Industrial Generators

Joseph Coupal - Monday, September 25, 2017

There are hundreds, or possibly thousands, of federal, state, local and municipal codes that may impact the location of an industrial generator. This makes it critical to work with local professionals who are aware of the codes and as well as the preferences of AHJs. South Shore Generator has significant amounts of knowledge about the systems and the optimal design practices for their localities. These professionals may be able to save customers time and resources by avoiding potential problems.

Location Considerations When Installing Commercial and Industrial Standby Generators

For Indoor Applications, The Key Factors Are:

Space: Generators are large and bulky, so cost, logistics and maximizing space for the building occupants must be considered in determining the location of the generators.

Airflow: To prevent overheating, there must be adequate airflow around the generator and the installation must meet NEC requirements. This could entail the use of a remote cooling system, which adds complexity to the design.

Fuel Delivery: Diesel generators remain the most commonly used in commercial/industrial applications. In most cases, a large outdoor fuel sub tank is linked to a smaller, indoor day tank. The linkage and collections between the tanks add more potential points of failure to this indoor solution.

Sound/Vibration: The generator engine and possibly the remote cooling systems can be noisy. Vibration isolators and other barriers may be needed to prevent inconvenience to building tenants.

Security/Access: Only authorized personnel should have access to the area where the generator plant is located to ensure generator reliability and safety.

For Outdoor Applications, The Key Factors Are:

Clearance and Wind Patterns: Note where snow and other debris typically accumulates at the location and place the generator elsewhere. Also, providing adequate clearance for the generators is key.

Severe Weather Patterns: When possible, place a natural or physical barrier between the prevailing storm direction and the generator. This can help ensure the generator will still operate during extreme weather events.

Potential for Flooding: The Gulf and Eastern Coastal areas have experienced much flooding in recent years, so engineers are requiring generators to be placed on platforms. However, if the incoming utility and electrical distribution are not also set above the flood line, the solution may not work.

Sound Considerations: Local ordinances have sound (dba) requirements that are set at the property line. Generators that are placed an appropriate distance away from property lines, may not need special sound attenuating enclosures.

Security/Access: Be sure that service technicians are able to access the generator during all types of harsh weather conditions, including rain, snow and ice. Also, ensure that only authorized personnel can access the generator to ensure safety and security.

For more information on installation of industrial generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: generac.com

Gas Generators for Industrial Power Systems

Joseph Coupal - Wednesday, September 13, 2017
South Shore Generator - KOLHER Diesel Generators

Gas Generators can be custom-made to meet your needs with purpose-built solutions for every application. Protect your critical power applications with the generators that are proven to work. Custom-tailored to your specifications. And engineered to provide you with consistent, reliable power.

Before our gas generators see the light of day, they endure our extreme testing standards. And to make sure they hold up in harsh conditions, we coat the generator enclosures, skids and components with Power Armor® Paint System, a textured industrial finish that provides corrosion-resistant, heavy-duty durability.

Total System Integration

But the best part? We engineer every detail down to the last bolt. From generators and transfer switches to paralleling switchgear and controllers, everything works together seamlessly. Because we designed, engineered and tested it that way.

That’s the Kohler difference.

Good news: you can forget all that one-size-fits-all nonsense. KOHLER® gas generators are tailored and targeted to your specific job requirements. Unlike most generator models, every KOHLER generator is designed to work precisely for standby, prime or continuous applications. So you know you’re getting the right power and the right power rating—and enjoying huge cost savings along the way.

But we didn’t just stop there. We’ve also simplified the installation process—every model* is available EPA-certified to meet operational requirements on pipeline natural gas. There’s no need to certify or recertify.

Standard features:

Tested and Approved - KOHLER generators meet tough industry testing and quality standards (UL, CSA, IBC, NFPA).

One-Step Full-Load Acceptance - Our gas generators accept full load to keep you up and running.

Ultimate Performance - Our 1800-rpm engines run quietly and efficiently to extend generator life and provide significant fuel savings.

Factory-Certified Generators - Every size KOHLER gas generator is available EPA-certified*, ECM controlled and designed to meet the latest spark-ignited emission requirements.

Versatile Power - KOHLER gas generators are made for more than just emergencies. You can also use them for standby, prime and continuous applications.

For more information on industrial gas generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: resources.kohler.com


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