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How Does a Standby Generator Work? - Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Watch the video to see an onsite demonstration of how a standby generator works for you. Starting with the transfer switch, the entire process will only take 10 seconds.



For more information on standby generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

What Size and Type of Back Up Generator Do You Need? Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Thursday, April 06, 2017
South Shore Generator - Back Up Generator  Wareham, MA
  1. Portable. When the power goes out, you have to start up a gas-powered portable generator and plug it into your appliances or a subpanel. Portable generators cost $500 to $1,500 depending on power output.
  2. Standby. These generators are powered by natural gas or propane and start automatically during power outages. Prices start at $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit, including installation.

How to determine what size generator you need Add up your power needs Estimate your power needs before you shop for a generator. Look for a label on each appliance that you want to power during an electrical outage. Add up the watts to determine the generator size you need. You can also get an idea of wattage requirements here. Wattage Requirements

  • Microwave: 600 to 1,200 watts
  • Refrigerator: 700 to 1,200 watts
  • Freezer: 500 to 1,200 watts
  • Washing machine: 1,200 watts
  • 1/3-hp sump pump: 800 watts
  • Television: 300 watts
  • Laptop computer: 250 watts
  • 10,000-Btu air conditioner: 1,500 watts

Your first step in adding backup power is deciding what you need (or want) to keep running when the electricity goes out. This determines the size (wattage) of the generator you’ll need. Walk through the house and make a list of everything you want to power during an outage. Look for a label on each appliance (they have to have one) that contains information such as wattage, model number and the year it was made (photo). Some labels are right inside the door on appliances; others are on the back, so you have to pull the appliance away from the wall. Write down the item and how much wattage it uses. Be sure to include essential items, like refrigerators, freezers, a well pump if you have one, and a sump pump if your basement could flood. You can go a few hours or even days without an oven (use the microwave instead) and an air conditioner—they use a lot of power and would require you to buy a much bigger generator. Add together the items’ wattages, then multiply that number by 1.5 (appliances need the extra power to start up). That’s the minimum wattage needed for your generator.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Size Up Your Generator Needs - Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, April 04, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler 8.5 RES-QS7

Even if it is a milder hurricane season this year, one tropical storm can inflict a lot of damage. So, how to size a generator and use it safely?

The experts at Consumer Reports say to pick a model with a wattage at least equal to the total of what you're powering. Manufacturers also suggest totaling the higher surge watts some appliances draw when they cycle on. A small portable, up to 4,000 watts, can typically power a refrigerator, sump pump, microwave, TV, and a few lights but you may want more oomph than that. Here are some recommended generators from our tests ranging from medium to large.

Midsized portable or small stationary, 5,000 to 8,500 watts

What it powers. Everything that a small model can power plus a portable heater (1,300 watts), computer (250 watts), heating system (500 watts), second pump (600 watts), and more lights (400 watts).

Recommended stationary. Kohler 8.5 RES-QS7, $3,200. Stationary generators turn themselves on and off when needed and run on propane or natural gas for longer runtime and safer fueling. The Kohler delivered smooth, steady power and offers 7,000 watts with natural gas and 8,500 using propane. It was also among the quietest of the stationary models we tested, and it shuts down automatically if the engine-oil level gets low. On the downside, it's pricey and requires professional installation.

Large stationary, 10,000 to 15,000 watts

What it powers. Everything you can run with a midsized model plus a choice of small water heater (3,000 watts), central air conditioner (5,000 watts), electric range (5,000 watts), clothes washer (1,200 watts), or electric dryer (5,000 watts).

Recommended model. Generac 6241, $3,500. This stationary generator was top-notch at providing ample, smooth power with consistent voltage. Generac claims the unit supplies 13,000 watts using natural gas and an additional 1,000 using propane. It also comes with a transfer switch, needed for safe operation. Among features are fuel shutoff, low-oil shutoff with an indicator, and electric start.

For more information on stationary or portable generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: consumerreports.org

Generac Generators: Get Prepared for Any Type of Power Outage - Wareham MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 27, 2017

When the storm hits, you're powerless. No refrigerator, no anti-theft systems, no computers, no lights. With Generac, your family stays safe. Powered by natural gas or propane, there are no extension cords to deal with.

No matter what knocks out the power, whether you are home or not, the minute the power goes out the generator goes on. Never feel powerless.

Watch the video to see more information on how your life can remain uninterrupted.


Fore more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham MA.

Choosing a Marine Generator – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 20, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

Today’s sport-fishing boats brim with power-hungry electrical equipment, from air conditioning to audio systems, spreader lights to live-bait pumps, refrigerators to radars and microwaves to water makers.

Supplying enough current for all of these accessories can pose a challenge, particularly on extended trips to fish remote waters with few marinas and no shore power. One option is to run the main engines to keep power flowing to the AC/DC system. Yet fumes, vibration, noise and fuel consumption render this practice annoying, especially on anchor or tied to the dock.

A quiet-running marine generator offers a more pleasing solution. Whether you’re adding, upgrading or ordering a new boat, consider these factors when choosing among the many brands and models of gensets.

Space Constraints

If adding a generator, think about location. Generators go below deck, often in the engine room or an aft compartment. Determine how easily you can access the space for installation and maintenance, as well as how the new unit will affect weight distribution.

For tight spaces, look at compact generator sets. On boats less than 30 feet in length, fitting in a genset could prove impossible. In these cases, a portable generator might be your only option.

Fuel of Choice

For convenience, choose a genset that operates on the same fuel as your boat. For example, with gasoline inboards, select a gasoline generator so you can tap the main tank.

There is one possible exception. On an outboard fishing boat, which runs on gas, it’s sometimes wise to have a diesel generator. Outboard boats rarely feature ventilation for below-deck compartments. Diesel (less volatile than gas) is safer to use in such enclosed spaces. You’ll need a separate diesel tank, so account for that when evaluating available space. If adding a marine generator you’ll also need to customize a system to usher air to the generator.

Most large sport-fishing boats usually have diesel inboards, so a diesel generator makes the most sense. Whether you choose gas or diesel, a separate canister-style fuel filter helps ensure delivery of clean, water-free fuel to the genset.

Output Options

Marine generators are rated by kilowatt output — from as little as 3.5 kW to as much as 200 kW. To determine the right model, add up the power needs for the accessories you plan to run. Then select a marine generator with about 20 percent more output than your total requirement. Resist thinking that more is better. A genset running at insufficient load leads to carbon buildup and other complications. On the other hand, don’t run all of your accessories at once. A genset operates best when carrying 35 percent to 70 percent of its rated load.

Installation Details

Gensets are water cooled, so when adding a unit plan on installing a water intake with a strainer to keep debris from clogging the cooling system. Also, you’ll need plumbing for cooling water to exit overboard.

As mentioned, gensets need air. Yet gensets also need exhaust systems. If adding a unit to your boat, plan on having a separate exhaust rather than sharing the engines’ exhaust system.

Most gensets come with remote ignition switches and basic gauges for installation above deck — usually near the helm or in a cabin — and a second control panel on or near the genset.

Quiet and Clean

Thanks to insulating shields, isolation mounts, mufflers and underwater exhaust, marine generators are quieter than ever. How quiet? Some generate just 66 decibels at a meter away. That’s about the same as a four-stroke outboard at 1,000 rpm when recorded at the helm. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a concern, especially with gas generators. Yet companies such as Kohler now make low-CO gasoline generators with lower emissions. The Kohler Low CO models feature self-monitoring systems that shut down the generator if CO builds to dangerous levels.

As the electrical demands of today’s sport-fishing boats grow, so too does the need for a convenient way to keep the current flowing. Today’s gensets deliver, whether at the dock or far from the marina.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: Sport Fishing

The Right Size Generator for Your Home – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 13, 2017
South Shore Generator for your home - Warenham, MA

Add up the items you need to power before making your choice

Power outages are often the collateral damage of severe snow and rain storms and other acts of nature. After you've experienced a few you're more likely to consider getting a generator to keep your home’s electricity humming. But before you buy think about whether you want to power your whole house or if you can get by for a few days with just the basics. Here's what we recommend when it comes to choosing the right generator size.

Generators come in two types: portable and stationary, also called standby. Portables cost less to buy and install, but you’ll need to keep it fueled and maintained yourself. A portable also needs to be wheeled outdoors, started, and connected to what you want to power. A stationary model, by contrast, needs to be professionally installed outdoors, which adds expense, but it starts automatically when power cuts off and also performs its own periodic checks—and displays a warning if it needs service.

What to Know About Wattage

To determine generator size, the easiest way is to add up the wattages of everything in your home you want to power with a generator. But some appliances, such as an air conditioner, refrigerator, and sump pumps, require more wattage (called surge watts) when they’re cycling on. It can also be difficult to gauge how much power certain hard-wired appliances, such as your furnace, require. For these reasons we suggest you consult with an electrician, and select a model with a slightly higher rated wattage that will accommodate additional products you might buy.

Also, figure in a few hundred dollars more to install a transfer switch, which allows easy connections for a portable generator. (Stationary generators often come with one.) This component also keeps utility power from frying the circuits you’re protecting once the power returns—and potentially protects any utility workers who might be working on the line. It also protects your generator.

Our generator buying guide lists what the various wattage ranges of both portable and stationary generators will support..

Get Wise About Size

To figure out what generator size you need, follow these simple guidelines. The larger the generator, the more you're likely to pay.

  • Just the basics: Small portable (3,000 to 4,000 watts)
    What it powers: Refrigerator, sump pump, several lights, television.
  • Basics plus creature comforts: Mid-sized portable or small stationary (5,000 to 8,500 watts)
    What it powers: The basics, plus portable heater, computer, heating system, well pump, more lights.
  • A larger load: Large portable (10,000 watts)
    What it powers: Everything above plus small electric water heater, central air conditioner, electric range.
  • The whole house: Large stationary (10,000 to 15,000 watts)
    What it powers: Same as large portables, plus clothes washer, electric dryer.

Some Top Performers

Here are some recommended models from testing over 37 models.

  • Kohler PRO7.5E, $1,400, a 6,300-watt portable that supplied plenty of power, and cleanly, with less noise than many competing models;
  • Generac RS7000E, $900, a 7,000-watt model that performed nearly as well;
  • Generac 6237, $2,250 (with transfer switch), a stationary generator that delivers 7,000 watts using natural gas and 8,000 using propane; and
  • Kohler 14RESAL, $3,700 (with transfer switch), a larger stationary generator that supplied 12,000 watts using natural gas—and 2,000 more with propane.

Whichever generator size you choose, don’t wait until a major storm is forecast to buy it. In addition to facing a more limited selection, you’ll cheat yourself out of the weeks you need to plan your purchase and get it installed before you can enjoy the protection of a generator that will serve you for years to come.

For more information contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: consumerreports.org

Stationary or Portable Generator? – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 06, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac 6237 portable generator

Your power needs, spending power, and ability to roll out the generator when it’s needed are chief criteria for choosing what’s best.

The choice boils down to cost vs. convenience. If you want to be ready for any power outage anytime, nothing beats a stationary generator. Once it’s installed, it just fires up—automatically—when needed. But most people choose a portable generator because it costs far less and is simpler to set up. Here are other benefits and drawbacks of each:

Portable Generators

Power output: For models that can connect to a transfer switch, usually 5,000 to 7,500 watts.

Price range (as tested): $500 to $4,000; inverter generators, $1,600 to $4,500.

Pros: A portable generator can be transported easily from one location to another. Setup is as simple as turning them on and powering items. And they can be shared among neighbors.

Cons: They run on fuel, and fuel storage can be a challenge. And though they include a number of power outlets, running extension cords to a portable generator also poses safety risks; that’s why a transfer switch is recommended.

Fuel needs: A 7,000-watt portable generator will use 12 to 20 gallons of gasoline per day if it runs continuously for 24 hours. More powerful generators use more fuel.

Stationary Generators

Power output: 8,000 to more than 20,000 watts.

Price range: $1,900 to $5,000 or more, plus installation (about $2,000 to $10,000).

Pros: They start automatically when the power goes out and often supply more power. They also periodically run a self-¬diagnosis routine that can alert you to problems. That enables you to get problems fixed before you need the generator. They run on natural gas or propane and save you the hassle and safety risks of storing fuel.

Cons: Beyond the higher cost of purchase and installation, they often require municipal permits and site approvals.

Fuel needs: A small 8,000-watt stationary model can run for eight to 15 days on a 250-gallon propane tank or indefinitely on a natural gas line.

A Greener, Quieter Alternative

Unlike most portable generators, which run at one engine speed, inverter generators have smart circuitry that varies engine speed depending on what they’re powering. That conserves gasoline and cuts down on the noise.

Another important benefit of inverter generators is that they dispense power smoothly at a consistent voltage. That so-called clean power (measured by the Total Harmonic Distortion, THD, in industry lingo) is less likely to damage the sensitive electronics found in computers, TVs, chargers, and many appliances today.

If that kind of clean, even power is a real priority, then consider a stationary generator. They provide more overall wattage and quality of power for the money, even when installation costs are factored in.

For more information, contact South Shore Generators in Wareham, MA.

Source: consumerreports.org

New Kohler Residential/Light Commercial Generator – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 27, 2017
South Shore Generator - KOHLER 30RCL Generator

Kohler ®Generators has a 30 kW standby generator that is designed for large homes and small businesses. The KOHLER 30RCL quickly restores power following an outage and features a robust 1,800-rpm liquid-cooled KOHLER® engine and patented noise-reduction technology that keeps sound levels to a minimum.

As people continue to build larger homes, there has been an increased demand for a residential generator of this size. The 30RCL really represents a sweet spot within our existing lineup of automatic backup generators. It’s an ideal size for today’s larger homes and Kohler anticipates homeowners responding strongly to the combination of power and quiet operation that this new model offers. Designed for whole-house power, the 30RCL will keep major systems and appliances – including HVAC, lights, refrigerators, sump pumps and security systems – running in the event of a power outage. It can also protect sensitive electronics, including smartphones, computers and entertainment systems, due to its outstanding voltage and frequency regulation as well as ultra-low levels of harmonic distortion.

As an added benefit, the 30RCL runs at only 62 decibels during normal operation and 54 decibels during weekly exercise, which is no louder than a typical conversation. While ideal for larger homes, the 30RCL generator can also be specified for light commercial applications, including offices and other small businesses.

Similar to all KOHLER standby generators, the new 30RCL automatically turns on within seconds of a power outage. It runs on self-feeding fuels such as liquid propane (LP) or natural gas, eliminating the need to ever manually refuel the unit. Other features include:

*Based on load size

  • 1,800 rpm, 2.2L turbo-4 cylinder engine
  • 60 Hz single-phase and 60 Hz three-phrase (208, 240 and 480V), running on natural gas or LP
  • Corrosion-resistant, neutral-colored aluminum enclosure
  • KOHLER brushless, rotating field alternator with broad range reconnectability
  • RDC2 controller
  • Compatible with LCM, RXT, RDT RSB, ATS’s and OnCue Plus®Generator Management System (GM81385-KP2-QS) and Programmable Interface Module (PIM)
  • UL/CSA certifications
  • Five-year, 2,000 hour warranty

The 30RCL joins the existing 24, 38, 48 and 60 kW models within Kohler’s popular family of residential/light commercial generators. The entire product offering from Kohler Generators now extends from 8 kW all the way to 150 kW to cover essentially all backup power needs. For more information contact South Shore Generator.

Source: prweb.com

Need a Generator? Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 20, 2017
South Shore Generator - Residential Portable Generator

When a big storm is bearing down and you don’t have a generator, you may not have time to take all the safety precautions that are usually recommended such as hiring a pro to install a transfer switch and stocking up on gas. But even without taking those precautions, there are ways to safely get a new generator up and running until you can find an electrician to install the appropriate safeguards. What you want to avoid is connecting the generator to your breaker panel yourself, without an interlock device or transfer switch, which can result in frying your electronics and potentially injuring a utility worker once the power comes back on. Follow these five recommendations to get the power back on safely in no time.

  1. Choose a Model With a Removable Console

    Portable generators have outlets that let you power appliances directly rather than through your home’s wiring. The problem is that you then need extension cords to get power into your home, an arrangement that has risks—creating the potential to become overloaded and arc, or to be punctured if they’re run through open windows or doorways.

    But some newer generators have the outlets on a removable console, tethered to one long, heavy-gauge power cord, which is less prone to pinching and is designed to carry the entire electrical load that the generator can power. That allows you to take the console indoors to plug in your appliances while operating the generator outdoors.

  2. Buy the Right Extension Cords if You Need Them

    Extension cords pose hazards, particularly if they’re used outdoors or to carry the load of high-wattage appliances. But if you have no choice—either because you don't have a generator with a removable console or because the console won’t reach all of the appliances you need to plug in—check the owner’s manual to see what gauge cords it recommends. And make sure that they’re rated for indoor and outdoor use.

    Don’t run the extension cords under rugs or allow them to become pinched in windows or doors. Use a rubber doorstop to prevent doors from closing all the way and crimping the cords. You’ll need a separate cord for each outlet on the generator you intend to utilize—using a splitter or surge protector to plug multiple devices into a single extension cord can cause the cord to overheat and arc. Check the cord label for the maximum wattage it’s safely rated to carry, then use our wattage calculator to make sure whatever device you plan on plugging in doesn’t exceed that rating.

  3. Calculate Your Power Needs

    If you're just buying a generator, plan on getting one rated to produce the power of every device you’ll want to plug in. Our wattage calculator can quickly help with that task, but keep in mind that using a portable generator’s built-in outlets or power console means you can power only electronics with standard, 110-volt plugs. Hardwired appliances such as a furnace, central air conditioner, or well pump won’t work, nor will those that run on 220 volts, such as electric ranges or dryers.

    But it may still be worth buying a generator rated to power all of those appliances, because if and when you have an electrician connect the generator to your breaker panel, you’ll want to know that the model you chose will be able to power your list of essentials.

  4. Select a Safe Spot

    Generators produce carbon monoxide and can be fatal if used indoors or too close to your home. That includes the garage, even if you leave the door open. And don’t even think about putting a generator in the attic or basement. The only safe spot to operate a generator is outdoors, a minimum of 15 feet from your house—and as far as possible from windows and doors.

    Driveways, stone patios, or level patches of grass are all good places to put your generator. And if it’s raining or snowing, you’ll need to cover the generator with a generator tent or cover. You can find model-specific covers online, but it’s fine to grab a generic generator tent at the home center, too.

  5. Don’t Forget Fuel

    Portable generators run on gasoline, and most can hold a maximum of around 8 gallons. Depending on the power load, that may only last several hours. Stock up on gasoline and store it in ANSI-approved containers, which have special pressure-relieving mechanisms. Mix the gas with fuel stabilizer and store it outside the house.

    And if you’re shopping for a portable generator, consider a model that can be converted to run continuously on propane or natural gas. You'll need a conversion kit and perhaps the help of a pro to install it, but either fuel will provide a more continuous source of power than a few gallons of gas the next time your need it.

Shopping for a generator? Contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: Consumer Reports

Preparing Your Home for Snowstorms – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, February 13, 2017
South Shore Generator -  Generac 22,000 Watt Air Cooled Standby Generator

The tradition continues, February in Massachusetts is snowy! Sudden severe winter weather can leave you scrambling for the tools and necessities to keep your family and your home safe during a winter snowstorm. Advance preparation and stocking up on necessities ahead of the storm saves you from costly home damage and keeps loved ones out of harm’s way.

Here are three simple ways to prepare for the snow:

  1. Prepare for freezing temperatures. Prevent pipes from bursting when the winter storm comes by insulating them before the temperature drops. Wall pipe insulation helps keep heat in while maximizing energy savings. For extreme temperatures, use electric water pipe heating cables to prevent frozen pipes and to help thaw out frozen pipes. Additionally, make sure your home is properly insulated ahead of the cold front to ensure that heat stays in and the cold stays out.
  2. Power up for snow removal. Make sure you are prepared with the essentials to get outdoors before the storm hits. If the snow is deep enough, it is possible to get your car stuck in the driveway. Before doing any work clearing the snow, be sure to stretch and warm up your body to avoid injury. Clear a path to the road before attempting to move your car. Keep both a wide plastic shovel and a metal shovel handy to clear driveways and walkways. Use the plastic shovel first, as it is less likely to catch on the pavement, to push the snow from the center of the driveway to the outer edges. Then use the metal shovel to scoop the remaining snow out of the driveway. Take frequent breaks to prevent overexertion or serious injury. For heavy snowfall, use a snow blower to quickly and effectively clear large areas.
    Clear off your car with a good-quality snow brush to prevent any damage to the vehicle’s paint. Start at the top by brushing off the roof, then move down to the windows, hood and trunk. Clean the front and rear lights last. Scrape away any ice from your vehicle with a short-handled ice scraper. Work the blade under the ice sheet to scrape the glass, not the ice.
  3. Stock up severe weather essentials. If you live in an area that frequently loses power, keep a standby generator handy. The Generac 22,000 Watt Air Cooled Standby Generator provides whole house coverage for many homes and is designed to handle extended run times and extreme conditions. Always be sure to run generators outside and connect your equipment using extension cords that are grounded, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Also be sure to stock up on essentials such as flashlights, batteries, a weather radio, first-aid kits, nonperishable foods, bottled water and any necessary medications.

For more information on generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham.

Source: stltoday.com


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