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2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
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Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

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Best Lightweight Portable Generators

Joseph Coupal - Monday, June 26, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Pro7.5e portable generator

The best lightweight portable generators can give you all the power you need for good times in the great outdoors. With a complete line of lightweight portable generators from twenty pounds to sixty pounds, you are presented with convenient choice.

How You Will Use Your Portable Generator

It is extremely important to consider the weight of your portable generator with respect to how you are going to use the unit. Lightweight portable generators are ideal choices for lighting up a campsite, charging your boat battery, powering your small appliances, and for powering your tailgating appliances. As you can see, the portability of the generator matters a lot.

It will take you less energy to place your portable generator into the boot of your van while going camping. In fact, a unit of this nature can be handheld, something that is impossible with large portable generators. As far as the usage is concerned, most of the lightweight portable generators have relatively convenient wattage ratings, both for the surge as well as constant wattage.

Features to Look For

Apart from being compact and lightweight, you need to make certain that the lightweight portable generator you choose fulfills all your appliances requirements. You should look for portable generator models that provide fuel efficient operation, along with quiet power for your recreational as well as household requirements. The best lightweight portable generators you consider should pack as many features as possible into a strong, but lightweight generator design.

The portable generator you choose should be built around innovative systems, which have the capacity of delivering higher quality as well as cleaner electricity. The power produced by the portable generator you choose should be reliable. With higher quality, cleaner power, you will be able to run sensitive appliances without concerns of them getting damaged. You should also ensure that the gen-set you select has overload protection; this helps to protect the generator against unexpected overload.

The best lightweight portable generators should be integrated with optimal fuel efficiency. Choose a lightweight portable unit with a convenient fuel tank capacity that can keep the generator running for a good number of hours on a single fill. The engine should be air-cooled OHV model, with an effective horsepower and engine displacement. Units that are user-friendly are highly recommended.

Apart from the lightweight features, a good portable generator should have a centralized control panel. A centralized panel provides you with the opportunity of accessing all the generator features easily. It is also advisable to go for generators with noise reduction capabilities. Therefore, you need to engage lightweight portable generators with super-quiet mufflers, in addition to vibration isolating feet. Any portable generator with the stated features will definitely have a lower noise level, mostly ranging between fifty and seventy decibels.

Conclusion

As far as the best lightweight portable generators are concerned, you can effectively carry one of them to the campsite, boating activities, and tailgating. These portable generators are ready to provide you with clean and quiet power for any low-powered appliance. You should unquestionably buy one of these generators. Well, they might be lightweight and smaller, but be rest assured that they produce enormous electricity to power your TV set, radio, camping lights, and so on. These portable generators are significantly useful to campers and tailgates, since they do not consume space, they are compact, and they are extremely super-quiet.

For more information on portable generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: smarthomekeeping.com

How to Choose the Best Diesel Portable Generators

Joseph Coupal - Monday, June 19, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Diesel Portable Generator

Generator Type, Size, and Load Pattern

You should always start your selection by considering the right type and size. You should do this with respect to the types of loads. Remember, not all appliances would consume power consistently or in the same manner. You can conveniently choose your desired diesel portable generator based on the following load patterns.

The first load pattern involves appliances with constant consumption, including kitchen resistors and incandescent bulbs. The second load pattern involves appliances with a peak in the startup, in which considerably more is consumed for a few seconds than that consumed thereafter. Ideally, these are appliances that consist of motors. In this situation the diesel generator you select has to be able to keep up with the sharp increase in consumption at the starting peak.

Estimating the Power Requirement

To be able to choose the best diesel portable generator for your appliances, you are advised to always measure the consumption if you can. Avoid as much as possible surprises due to misrepresentations and misleading assumptions. Take note of the usefulness of the power indicated on the appliance nameplate.

When using labels, you should take note of the following: power consumption depends greatly on the way you use your appliance. For instance, some appliances may consume more power if you use them for demanding jobs; and some consumption can be hidden. You should also optimize your consumption before you size your desired diesel generator.

Best Features to Look For

The best diesel portable generators you choose should be made of an engine made of a heavy duty cast iron sleeve design, since this helps to improve performance and longevity. The engine specs should include electric push start as well as recoil start. The presence of both startup mechanisms is useful during winter. The electric push start also does not consume much of your muscles when compared to recoil start.

Ensure the gen-set you consider buying has the following protection mechanisms: overvoltage protection, auto low-oil shutoff, and circuit protection. All these features combined help to protect your generator engine from damage, and improve the generators life span conveniently. Select the best diesel portable generators that have the most fitting continuous as well as surge wattage. Ensure that the continuous and surge wattage fulfill the needs of your appliance. Of all the features, you should engage diesel generators with a suitable noise level that will not interfere with your activities.

Consider the Voltage and Frequency Variations with Load

Normally, the motor of a diesel portable generator rotates at a constant speed, which is what determines the frequency of supply. The application of appliances causes the generator to slow down. Therefore, when the generator detects that it is being slowed, it increases the fuel input and accelerates again to try to regain cruising speed. The speed variations are followed by variations in voltage. The variations may potentially ruin your sensitive appliances. Therefore, when selecting a diesel portable generator, you should specify the type of response in addition to the power.

For more information on portable diesel generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: smarthomekeeping.com

How to Choose a Marine Generator

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, June 13, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

A marine generator will keep the current flowing to all of your electrical equipment on your boat

Marine generator

Today’s sport-fishing boats brim with power-hungry electrical equipment, from air conditioning to audio systems, spreader lights to live-bait pumps, refrigerators to radars and microwaves to water makers.

Supplying enough current for all of these accessories can pose a challenge, particularly on extended trips to fish remote waters with few marinas and no shore power. One option is to run the main engines to keep power flowing to the AC/DC system. Yet fumes, vibration, noise and fuel consumption render this practice annoying, especially on anchor or tied to the dock.

A quiet-running marine generator offers a more pleasing solution. Whether you’re adding, upgrading or ordering a new boat, consider these factors when choosing among the many brands and models of gensets.

If adding a genset, think about location. Generators go below deck, often in the engine room or an aft compartment. Determine how easily you can access the space for installation and maintenance, as well as how the new unit will affect weight distribution.

On boats less than 30 feet in length, fitting in a genset could prove impossible. In these cases, a portable marine generator might be your only option.

Fuel of Choice

For convenience, choose a genset that operates on the same fuel as your boat. For example, with gasoline inboards, select a gasoline genset so you can tap the main tank.

There is one possible exception. On an outboard fishing boat, which runs on gas, it’s sometimes wise to have a diesel generator. Outboard boats rarely feature ventilation for below-deck compartments. Diesel (less volatile than gas) is safer to use in such enclosed spaces. You’ll need a separate diesel tank, so account for that when evaluating available space. If adding a genset, you’ll also need to customize a system to usher air to the generator.

Most large sport-fishing boats usually have diesel inboards, so a diesel generator makes the most sense. Whether you choose gas or diesel, a separate canister-style fuel filter helps ensure delivery of clean, water-free fuel to the genset.

Output Options

Marine generators are rated by kilowatt output — from as little as 3.5 kW to as much as 200 kW. To determine the right model, add up the power needs for the accessories you plan to run. Then select a genset with about 20 percent more output than your total requirement.

Resist thinking that more is better. A genset running at insufficient load leads to carbon buildup and other complications. On the other hand, don’t run all of your accessories at once. A genset operates best when carrying 35 percent to 70 percent of its rated load.

Installation Details

Gensets are water cooled, so when adding a unit plan on installing a water intake with a strainer to keep debris from clogging the cooling system. Also, you’ll need plumbing for cooling water to exit overboard.

Most gensets come with remote ignition switches and basic gauges for installation above deck — usually near the helm or in a cabin — and a second control panel on or near the genset.

Quiet and Clean

Thanks to insulating shields, isolation mounts, mufflers and underwater exhaust, marine generators are quieter than ever. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a concern, especially with gas generators. Yet companies such as Kohler (www.kohler.com) now make low-CO gasoline generators with lower emissions. The Kohler Low CO models feature self-monitoring systems that shut down the generator if CO builds to dangerous levels.

As the electrical demands of today’s sport-fishing boats grow, so too does the need for a convenient way to keep the current flowing. Today’s gensets deliver, whether at the dock or far from the marina.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: sportfishingmag.com

Stationary Generators and Portable Generators: What You Need to Know

Joseph Coupal - Friday, June 09, 2017
South Shore Generator Generac 6237 portable generator

Stationary Generators

  • These units cost more money and should be installed by a pro (so factor in labor costs). An experienced electrician can help with town or municipal permits, noise restrictions, and proper location.
  • These start automatically when the power goes out, and often supply more power.
  • They run a self-diagnosis and let you know when maintenance is needed. Some even do this via email or text, to you or your dealer.
  • You have your choice of fuel—natural gas or propane, both of which are less risky to store than gasoline.
  • They range from roughly 5,000 to 20,000 watts.
  • They cost from $5,000 to $10,000.

Portable Generators

  • These units tend to cost less.
  • They run on gas or propane that you may need to store in large quantities. Stabilizer must be added to store gasoline safely.
  • You can use them anywhere on or off your property, but they must be at least 15 feet away from your house, doors, or windows—and not in an enclosed space. If it's raining, you must use a tent or cover.
  • Several of these models offer electric starting. The battery required, however, may not be included.
  • They provide from 3,000 to 8,500 watts.
  • They cost from $400 to $1,000.

Generator Features That Count

Don't let rain, snow, or wind keep you in the dark. Consider these options to make sure you get the best generator for your needs.

Automatic Start

When the power goes off, the stationary generator goes on—without your intervention. This is great if you travel a lot or have a long commute.

Electric Start

Several portables offer this push-button alternative to the hassle of pull-starting the engine. Just factor in the added cost (around $50) if the battery is not included. Stationary models have automatic starting.

Alternative Fuel Capacity

Most portable models run only on gasoline, though some come equipped to run on a propane tank or natural-gas line—or can be converted with kits. Wheels

Believe it or not, some portables price these separately. You could probably move a wheeled generator solo, but without wheels, you'd need help. (All the ones we've tested weigh upwards of 200 pounds.) Wheels can cost up to $150 extra.

Fuel Gauge

Check fuel level at a glance on a portable; this is especially useful during long blackouts.

Low-Oil Shutoff

If oil falls below minimum levels, the generator shuts down to prevent damage. This is usually standard on stationary generators, but it's increasingly common on portables, too.

Inverter Technology

On some higher-end portables; this provides cleaner power that won't overheat sensitive electronics. Some campsites require it because inverter generators typically run much more quietly.

Multiple Outlets

Four or more lets you best use the wattage by spreading the load, though we recommend using these only for emergency use—or for away uses such as camping. See the next section on transfer switches.

Removable Console

This connects to the generator so you can plug in appliances without running (potentially risky) extension cords outdoors.

For more information, contact South Shore Generators in Wareham, MA.

Source: Consumer Reports

What Size and Type of Back Up Generator Do You Need?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, June 06, 2017
  1. Portable

    When the power goes out, you have to start up a gas-powered portable generator and plug it into your appliances or a subpanel. Portable generators cost $500 to $1,500 depending on power output.

  2. Standby

    These generators are powered by natural gas or propane and start automatically during power outages. Prices start at $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit, including installation.

How to determine what size generator you need

Add up your power needs

Estimate your power needs before you shop for a generator. Look for a label on each appliance that you want to power during an electrical outage. Add up the watts to determine the generator size you need. You can also get an idea of wattage requirements here.

South Shore Generator -  Generac 22,000 Watt Air Cooled Standby Generator

Wattage Requirements
Microwave: 600 to 1,200 watts
Refrigerator: 700 to 1,200 watts
Freezer: 500 to 1,200 watts
Washing machine: 1,200 watts
1/3-hp sump pump: 800 watts
Television: 300 watts
Laptop computer: 250 watts
10,000-Btu air conditioner: 1,500 watts

Your first step in adding backup power is deciding what you need (or want) to keep running when the electricity goes out. This determines the size (wattage) of the generator you’ll need.

Walk through the house and make a list of everything you want to power during an outage. Look for a label on each appliance (they have to have one) that contains information such as wattage, model number and the year it was made (photo). Some labels are right inside the door on appliances; others are on the back, so you have to pull the appliance away from the wall. Write down the item and how much wattage it uses. Be sure to include essential items, like refrigerators, freezers, a well pump if you have one, and a sump pump if your basement could flood. You can go a few hours or even days without an oven (use the microwave instead) and an air conditioner—they use a lot of power and would require you to buy a much bigger generator.

Add together the items’ wattages, then multiply that number by 1.5 (appliances need the extra power to start up). That’s the minimum wattage needed for your generator.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: familyhandyman.com

Make Portable Power More Convenient with a Manual Transfer Switch Panel

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 30, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Manual Switch Transfer

To use a portable generator without the hassle of running extension cords, install a manual transfer switch subpanel off your main circuit panel and install a dedicated inlet to power the subpanel (installing the subpanel is complex; not a DIY project). This setup gives you the advantage of powering entire circuits in the house, not just individual appliances. The drawback is you still have to start and maintain the gas-powered generator. And unless you buy a large generator (they’re available with more than 15,000 watts), you’re still limited in what you can power.

Before calling an electrician to add the subpanel, choose what you want to power during an outage. It’s worth including a circuit that’ll let you run your TV, computer and a lamp, especially if you lose power for days at a time, so you can keep everyone entertained. Plus, these electronic devices don’t require a lot of wattage. The circuits you want powered will be moved from your main circuit panel to your subpanel, so they’ll run when you have normal power and when you lose electricity and hook up the generator.

During a power outage, run a cord from the generator to the inlet, flip a manual transfer switch on the subpanel, and all the designated circuits will have power. Choose a heavy-duty extension cord (photo above left) with twist-lock ends (generators have receptacles for these ends) that stay in place once they’re plugged into the generator and inlet. Be sure to keep the generator at least 10 ft. from the house.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: familyhandyman.com

Customer Service Specialist Employment Opportunity - Wareham MA

Bernadette Braman - Thursday, May 25, 2017

Customer Service Specialist

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Answer in-bound calls (up to 50/day or more during times of high demand) from customers and technicians and answer questions over the phone.
  • Gather and prepare documentation regarding repairs and maintenance.
  • Troubleshoot with the Service Manager to resolve issues with technicians in the field.
  • The ability to evaluate a situation independently and schedule.
  • Consider multiple tasks at once and prioritize effectively and efficiently.
  • Provide customer service excellence for both external and internal customers.
  • Coordinate and structure service technicians schedule each day (currently 14 with the possibility of more to be added).
  • Monitor to ensure that work meets quality standards and accuracy.
  • Consistently carry out the directions of supervisor.
  • Responsible for cleanliness and organization of work station.
  • Ability to follow through and up on daily tasks to completion.
  • Overcome objections or hostility diplomatically.
  • Perform other duties as assigned in an ever changing and adapting work environment.

Additional Qualifications and Responsibilities:

  • Ability to communicate verbally and in writing in a professional manner.
  • Ability to work independently and make decisions in the best interest of the customer and the company.
  • Strong foundation of basic mechanical fundamental theory.
  • Some knowledge of engine maintenance and troubleshooting to include: air cooled, liquid cooled units, gas, diesel, LP and natural gas fuel systems.
  • Ability to remain calm in high-stress situations.
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Maintaining the integrity of systems and standards.
  • Previous experience within functional area as assigned.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Associates Degree and/or experience for 2+ years

Physical Demands: While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to talk and hear; and use hands to manipulate objects or controls. The employee is regularly required to stand and walk. On occasion the incumbent may be required to stoop, bend or reach above the shoulders. The employee must occasionally lift up to 15 pounds. Specific conditions of this job include and are typical of frequent and continuous computer-based work requiring periods of sitting, close vision and ability to adjust focus.

Click to Download Application Form

How to Choose the Best Power Generator – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 23, 2017
South Shore Generator -  Best Power Generator – Wareham, MA

Below are the pros and cons of two types of emergency electrical generators—the portable type and the larger standby type—and tell you how to decide between them.

Emergency generators: Two options

With the American power grid becoming less reliable every year, power outages are bound to occur more frequently and last longer. That means you could end up sitting in the dark, sweating without an air conditioner, and eating canned meals while $300 worth of food spoils in your freezer. Meanwhile, your basement could flood since the sump pump is now worthless—and your kids could go crazy without a TV or computer.

Power grid problems aside, we all lose electricity occasionally. But when outages become routine, leaving you without electricity for days on end, it’s time to take action by getting a generator. Smaller, portable generators are great for powering the essentials, like the refrigerator and microwave, while large standby generators can power everything in your house.

Here is an outline of both types of generators (portable and standby) and both ways to deliver backup power (extension cords and subpanels). Here are the pros and cons of each system.

Option 1: Plug-in generators

The most basic method of supplying backup power is running a portable generator in your yard, then plugging in extension cords that plug into your appliances. It’s also the least expensive solution since you don’t need to hire an electrician to install a subpanel. The downside is you have to run extension cords everywhere you want power and you’re limited to how many things you can plug in at once (most generators have either two or four outlets). You also have to start and maintain the generator.

When the power goes out, place the generator on a flat surface outside, at least 10 ft. from the house. Don’t set it under awnings, canopies or carports, or inside the house or garage. It’s absolutely critical that you keep the generator away from your house and especially away from doors and windows—your life could depend on it! More people die from carbon monoxide poisoning from the gas engines on generators than from the disasters causing the power outages.

Option 2: Standby generators

Standby generators automatically turn on when the power goes out—you don’t have to do a thing. This is the best option if you frequently lose electricity and want to keep all or most of your appliances running. Most standby generators are powerful enough to run a central air conditioner, kitchen appliances and other large items—simultaneously. They’re also quieter than portable generators and you don’t need to worry about running cords or storing gasoline. The drawback is the price. You’ll need to have the generator, transfer switch and subpanel professionally installed.

A transfer switch constantly monitors power. If you lose electricity, it starts the generator automatically—even if you’re not home. When power is restored, the transfer switch shuts off the generator. Standby generators connect to your home’s fuel supply (natural gas or propane). If you don’t already have one of these fuel lines coming into the house, install a propane tank.

Standby generators range from $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit to more than $15,000 for a 30,000-watt unit (installation included). Home centers carry a limited selection of portable generators (but usually no standby units). Larger sizes and standby units are usually available through special order or from the manufacturer.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Add a Portable Generator to Your Boat and Expand Your Boating Options

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate.

Like any other piece of boating equipment, the choice of size and type of generator depends on how it is to be used. If the plan is to take it to the beach to provide power for a sound system or to keep the drinks cold, any number of small, portable gasoline units weighing as little as 50 pounds are available. There are many well-built players in the marine generator market. Research—an indispensable boating skill—will help locate and price these units in any skipper’s local area. Many of these small units are as quiet as the inside of a library—about 60 decibels—and they are so light and small they can easily be carried on all but the smallest boats. Many small boats have them on board as a safety item to provide emergency battery charging, since almost all of them are capable of producing direct current (DC).

If the generator is going to be used to power tools that are part of a vessel’s repair or maintenance system—such as a welding machine on a metal boat—the smaller portable units will generally not do the job. Any generator with an output of at least 5kW will be required if it is to be used as part of the repair and maintenance system of the boat, and it will not produce enough power to run all repair tools at the same time. However, it is perfectly adequate if the person doing the repairs is prepared to use one, or at the most, two power tools at the same time.

A generator of 12.5kW will produce the same power as is usually found in a small land-based home or condo and will generally enable all normal and regular electrical equipment to be operated at once. Larger boats, particularly those equipped with multiple chillers for air conditioning, or electric stoves, ovens, and refrigeration, should be looking at generators capable of producing 15-20kW.

In the past, smaller boats in the 25 to 30-foot range were simply not big enough to be able to carry the weight of an onboard built-in generator system. Similarly, gasoline-powered boats could not have onboard generators due to safety concerns because of gas fumes. However, in recent years a number of small diesel-powered generators have made their way onto the market. Some of them are referred to as “ignition proof” in that their operation will not trigger a gas fume explosion if installed in older gasoline-powered boats. They also have the advantage of being relatively lightweight. Many produce small output, diesel-powered generators in the 2.6 to 4kW range that are useful in even the smallest vessels. Not only do these smaller units provide power for 110V AC tools and equipment, they can keep batteries topped up through various available battery chargers.

With the ever-increasing availability of lithium ion batteries that can be charged very rapidly without adverse effects, generators that produce three-phase power are coming onto the market. These units can produce enough power to charge (through a special charger) a set of lithium batteries in a faction of the time single-phase power can do the same job. Standard appliances don’t like three-phase power, however. A number of smaller generators offer a three-phase option. Another option most of the manufacturers are now making available is a generator with Direct Current (DC) output. These units produce battery-charging power for vessels using an inverter to produce AC current from an onboard battery bank.

Any skipper who is considering adding a new generator to his boat should spend some time determining exactly what his electrical load is likely to be. All electrical appliances have the power requirements listed on the nameplate or electric motor. The power requirement will be listed in watts. When on full, electric heaters, refrigerators and freezers usually require 1,500 watts—to run them all at the same time will take 4.5kW. Don’t forget about a microwave, electric cooktop, water heater, and electronics. After all appliances and systems are examined and the skipper factors in how the electrical system will be used, the total power requirements will be determined and a decision on the type and size of generator can be made.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: southernboating.com

Add a Portable Generator to Your Boat and Expand Your Boating Options – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
South Shore Generator - Boating Options – Wareham, MA

When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate.

Like any other piece of boating equipment, the choice of size and type of generator depends on how it is to be used. If the plan is to take it to the beach to provide power for a sound system or to keep the drinks cold, any number of small, portable gasoline units weighing as little as 50 pounds are available. There are many well-built players in the marine generator market. Research—an indispensable boating skill—will help locate and price these units in any skipper’s local area. Many of these small units are as quiet as the inside of a library—about 60 decibels—and they are so light and small they can easily be carried on all but the smallest boats. Many small boats have them on board as a safety item to provide emergency battery charging, since almost all of them are capable of producing direct current (DC).

If the generator is going to be used to power tools that are part of a vessel’s repair or maintenance system—such as a welding machine on a metal boat—the smaller portable units will generally not do the job. Any generator with an output of at least 5kW will be required if it is to be used as part of the repair and maintenance system of the boat, and it will not produce enough power to run all repair tools at the same time. However, it is perfectly adequate if the person doing the repairs is prepared to use one, or at the most, two power tools at the same time.

A generator of 12.5kW will produce the same power as is usually found in a small land-based home or condo and will generally enable all normal and regular electrical equipment to be operated at once. Larger boats, particularly those equipped with multiple chillers for air conditioning, or electric stoves, ovens, and refrigeration, should be looking at generators capable of producing 15-20kW.

In the past, smaller boats in the 25 to 30-foot range were simply not big enough to be able to carry the weight of an onboard built-in generator system. Similarly, gasoline-powered boats could not have onboard generators due to safety concerns because of gas fumes. However, in recent years a number of small diesel-powered generators have made their way onto the market. Some of them are referred to as “ignition proof” in that their operation will not trigger a gas fume explosion if installed in older gasoline-powered boats. They also have the advantage of being relatively lightweight. Many produce small output, diesel-powered generators in the 2.6 to 4kW range that are useful in even the smallest vessels. Not only do these smaller units provide power for 110V AC tools and equipment, they can keep batteries topped up through various available battery chargers.

With the ever-increasing availability of lithium ion batteries that can be charged very rapidly without adverse effects, generators that produce three-phase power are coming onto the market. These units can produce enough power to charge (through a special charger) a set of lithium batteries in a faction of the time single-phase power can do the same job. Standard appliances don’t like three-phase power, however. A number of smaller generators offer a three-phase option. Another option most of the manufacturers are now making available is a generator with Direct Current (DC) output. These units produce battery-charging power for vessels using an inverter to produce AC current from an onboard battery bank.

Any skipper who is considering adding a new generator to his boat should spend some time determining exactly what his electrical load is likely to be. All electrical appliances have the power requirements listed on the nameplate or electric motor. The power requirement will be listed in watts. When on full, electric heaters, refrigerators and freezers usually require 1,500 watts—to run them all at the same time will take 4.5kW. Don’t forget about a microwave, electric cooktop, water heater, and electronics. After all appliances and systems are examined and the skipper factors in how the electrical system will be used, the total power requirements will be determined and a decision on the type and size of generator can be made.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: southernboating.com


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