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Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

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Stationary Generators and Portable Generators: What You Need to Know

Joseph Coupal - Friday, June 09, 2017
South Shore Generator Generac 6237 portable generator

Stationary Generators

  • These units cost more money and should be installed by a pro (so factor in labor costs). An experienced electrician can help with town or municipal permits, noise restrictions, and proper location.
  • These start automatically when the power goes out, and often supply more power.
  • They run a self-diagnosis and let you know when maintenance is needed. Some even do this via email or text, to you or your dealer.
  • You have your choice of fuel—natural gas or propane, both of which are less risky to store than gasoline.
  • They range from roughly 5,000 to 20,000 watts.
  • They cost from $5,000 to $10,000.

Portable Generators

  • These units tend to cost less.
  • They run on gas or propane that you may need to store in large quantities. Stabilizer must be added to store gasoline safely.
  • You can use them anywhere on or off your property, but they must be at least 15 feet away from your house, doors, or windows—and not in an enclosed space. If it's raining, you must use a tent or cover.
  • Several of these models offer electric starting. The battery required, however, may not be included.
  • They provide from 3,000 to 8,500 watts.
  • They cost from $400 to $1,000.

Generator Features That Count

Don't let rain, snow, or wind keep you in the dark. Consider these options to make sure you get the best generator for your needs.

Automatic Start

When the power goes off, the stationary generator goes on—without your intervention. This is great if you travel a lot or have a long commute.

Electric Start

Several portables offer this push-button alternative to the hassle of pull-starting the engine. Just factor in the added cost (around $50) if the battery is not included. Stationary models have automatic starting.

Alternative Fuel Capacity

Most portable models run only on gasoline, though some come equipped to run on a propane tank or natural-gas line—or can be converted with kits. Wheels

Believe it or not, some portables price these separately. You could probably move a wheeled generator solo, but without wheels, you'd need help. (All the ones we've tested weigh upwards of 200 pounds.) Wheels can cost up to $150 extra.

Fuel Gauge

Check fuel level at a glance on a portable; this is especially useful during long blackouts.

Low-Oil Shutoff

If oil falls below minimum levels, the generator shuts down to prevent damage. This is usually standard on stationary generators, but it's increasingly common on portables, too.

Inverter Technology

On some higher-end portables; this provides cleaner power that won't overheat sensitive electronics. Some campsites require it because inverter generators typically run much more quietly.

Multiple Outlets

Four or more lets you best use the wattage by spreading the load, though we recommend using these only for emergency use—or for away uses such as camping. See the next section on transfer switches.

Removable Console

This connects to the generator so you can plug in appliances without running (potentially risky) extension cords outdoors.

For more information, contact South Shore Generators in Wareham, MA.

Source: Consumer Reports

What Size and Type of Back Up Generator Do You Need?

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, June 06, 2017
  1. Portable

    When the power goes out, you have to start up a gas-powered portable generator and plug it into your appliances or a subpanel. Portable generators cost $500 to $1,500 depending on power output.

  2. Standby

    These generators are powered by natural gas or propane and start automatically during power outages. Prices start at $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit, including installation.

How to determine what size generator you need

Add up your power needs

Estimate your power needs before you shop for a generator. Look for a label on each appliance that you want to power during an electrical outage. Add up the watts to determine the generator size you need. You can also get an idea of wattage requirements here.

South Shore Generator -  Generac 22,000 Watt Air Cooled Standby Generator

Wattage Requirements
Microwave: 600 to 1,200 watts
Refrigerator: 700 to 1,200 watts
Freezer: 500 to 1,200 watts
Washing machine: 1,200 watts
1/3-hp sump pump: 800 watts
Television: 300 watts
Laptop computer: 250 watts
10,000-Btu air conditioner: 1,500 watts

Your first step in adding backup power is deciding what you need (or want) to keep running when the electricity goes out. This determines the size (wattage) of the generator you’ll need.

Walk through the house and make a list of everything you want to power during an outage. Look for a label on each appliance (they have to have one) that contains information such as wattage, model number and the year it was made (photo). Some labels are right inside the door on appliances; others are on the back, so you have to pull the appliance away from the wall. Write down the item and how much wattage it uses. Be sure to include essential items, like refrigerators, freezers, a well pump if you have one, and a sump pump if your basement could flood. You can go a few hours or even days without an oven (use the microwave instead) and an air conditioner—they use a lot of power and would require you to buy a much bigger generator.

Add together the items’ wattages, then multiply that number by 1.5 (appliances need the extra power to start up). That’s the minimum wattage needed for your generator.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: familyhandyman.com

Make Portable Power More Convenient with a Manual Transfer Switch Panel

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 30, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Manual Switch Transfer

To use a portable generator without the hassle of running extension cords, install a manual transfer switch subpanel off your main circuit panel and install a dedicated inlet to power the subpanel (installing the subpanel is complex; not a DIY project). This setup gives you the advantage of powering entire circuits in the house, not just individual appliances. The drawback is you still have to start and maintain the gas-powered generator. And unless you buy a large generator (they’re available with more than 15,000 watts), you’re still limited in what you can power.

Before calling an electrician to add the subpanel, choose what you want to power during an outage. It’s worth including a circuit that’ll let you run your TV, computer and a lamp, especially if you lose power for days at a time, so you can keep everyone entertained. Plus, these electronic devices don’t require a lot of wattage. The circuits you want powered will be moved from your main circuit panel to your subpanel, so they’ll run when you have normal power and when you lose electricity and hook up the generator.

During a power outage, run a cord from the generator to the inlet, flip a manual transfer switch on the subpanel, and all the designated circuits will have power. Choose a heavy-duty extension cord (photo above left) with twist-lock ends (generators have receptacles for these ends) that stay in place once they’re plugged into the generator and inlet. Be sure to keep the generator at least 10 ft. from the house.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: familyhandyman.com

Customer Service Specialist Employment Opportunity - Wareham MA

Bernadette Braman - Thursday, May 25, 2017

Customer Service Specialist

Essential Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Answer in-bound calls (up to 50/day or more during times of high demand) from customers and technicians and answer questions over the phone.
  • Gather and prepare documentation regarding repairs and maintenance.
  • Troubleshoot with the Service Manager to resolve issues with technicians in the field.
  • The ability to evaluate a situation independently and schedule.
  • Consider multiple tasks at once and prioritize effectively and efficiently.
  • Provide customer service excellence for both external and internal customers.
  • Coordinate and structure service technicians schedule each day (currently 14 with the possibility of more to be added).
  • Monitor to ensure that work meets quality standards and accuracy.
  • Consistently carry out the directions of supervisor.
  • Responsible for cleanliness and organization of work station.
  • Ability to follow through and up on daily tasks to completion.
  • Overcome objections or hostility diplomatically.
  • Perform other duties as assigned in an ever changing and adapting work environment.

Additional Qualifications and Responsibilities:

  • Ability to communicate verbally and in writing in a professional manner.
  • Ability to work independently and make decisions in the best interest of the customer and the company.
  • Strong foundation of basic mechanical fundamental theory.
  • Some knowledge of engine maintenance and troubleshooting to include: air cooled, liquid cooled units, gas, diesel, LP and natural gas fuel systems.
  • Ability to remain calm in high-stress situations.
  • Working knowledge of Microsoft Office Suite.
  • Maintaining the integrity of systems and standards.
  • Previous experience within functional area as assigned.

Preferred Qualifications:

  • Associates Degree and/or experience for 2+ years

Physical Demands: While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to talk and hear; and use hands to manipulate objects or controls. The employee is regularly required to stand and walk. On occasion the incumbent may be required to stoop, bend or reach above the shoulders. The employee must occasionally lift up to 15 pounds. Specific conditions of this job include and are typical of frequent and continuous computer-based work requiring periods of sitting, close vision and ability to adjust focus.

Click to Download Application Form

How to Choose the Best Power Generator – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 23, 2017
South Shore Generator -  Best Power Generator – Wareham, MA

Below are the pros and cons of two types of emergency electrical generators—the portable type and the larger standby type—and tell you how to decide between them.

Emergency generators: Two options

With the American power grid becoming less reliable every year, power outages are bound to occur more frequently and last longer. That means you could end up sitting in the dark, sweating without an air conditioner, and eating canned meals while $300 worth of food spoils in your freezer. Meanwhile, your basement could flood since the sump pump is now worthless—and your kids could go crazy without a TV or computer.

Power grid problems aside, we all lose electricity occasionally. But when outages become routine, leaving you without electricity for days on end, it’s time to take action by getting a generator. Smaller, portable generators are great for powering the essentials, like the refrigerator and microwave, while large standby generators can power everything in your house.

Here is an outline of both types of generators (portable and standby) and both ways to deliver backup power (extension cords and subpanels). Here are the pros and cons of each system.

Option 1: Plug-in generators

The most basic method of supplying backup power is running a portable generator in your yard, then plugging in extension cords that plug into your appliances. It’s also the least expensive solution since you don’t need to hire an electrician to install a subpanel. The downside is you have to run extension cords everywhere you want power and you’re limited to how many things you can plug in at once (most generators have either two or four outlets). You also have to start and maintain the generator.

When the power goes out, place the generator on a flat surface outside, at least 10 ft. from the house. Don’t set it under awnings, canopies or carports, or inside the house or garage. It’s absolutely critical that you keep the generator away from your house and especially away from doors and windows—your life could depend on it! More people die from carbon monoxide poisoning from the gas engines on generators than from the disasters causing the power outages.

Option 2: Standby generators

Standby generators automatically turn on when the power goes out—you don’t have to do a thing. This is the best option if you frequently lose electricity and want to keep all or most of your appliances running. Most standby generators are powerful enough to run a central air conditioner, kitchen appliances and other large items—simultaneously. They’re also quieter than portable generators and you don’t need to worry about running cords or storing gasoline. The drawback is the price. You’ll need to have the generator, transfer switch and subpanel professionally installed.

A transfer switch constantly monitors power. If you lose electricity, it starts the generator automatically—even if you’re not home. When power is restored, the transfer switch shuts off the generator. Standby generators connect to your home’s fuel supply (natural gas or propane). If you don’t already have one of these fuel lines coming into the house, install a propane tank.

Standby generators range from $5,000 for a 7,000-watt unit to more than $15,000 for a 30,000-watt unit (installation included). Home centers carry a limited selection of portable generators (but usually no standby units). Larger sizes and standby units are usually available through special order or from the manufacturer.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Add a Portable Generator to Your Boat and Expand Your Boating Options

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate.

Like any other piece of boating equipment, the choice of size and type of generator depends on how it is to be used. If the plan is to take it to the beach to provide power for a sound system or to keep the drinks cold, any number of small, portable gasoline units weighing as little as 50 pounds are available. There are many well-built players in the marine generator market. Research—an indispensable boating skill—will help locate and price these units in any skipper’s local area. Many of these small units are as quiet as the inside of a library—about 60 decibels—and they are so light and small they can easily be carried on all but the smallest boats. Many small boats have them on board as a safety item to provide emergency battery charging, since almost all of them are capable of producing direct current (DC).

If the generator is going to be used to power tools that are part of a vessel’s repair or maintenance system—such as a welding machine on a metal boat—the smaller portable units will generally not do the job. Any generator with an output of at least 5kW will be required if it is to be used as part of the repair and maintenance system of the boat, and it will not produce enough power to run all repair tools at the same time. However, it is perfectly adequate if the person doing the repairs is prepared to use one, or at the most, two power tools at the same time.

A generator of 12.5kW will produce the same power as is usually found in a small land-based home or condo and will generally enable all normal and regular electrical equipment to be operated at once. Larger boats, particularly those equipped with multiple chillers for air conditioning, or electric stoves, ovens, and refrigeration, should be looking at generators capable of producing 15-20kW.

In the past, smaller boats in the 25 to 30-foot range were simply not big enough to be able to carry the weight of an onboard built-in generator system. Similarly, gasoline-powered boats could not have onboard generators due to safety concerns because of gas fumes. However, in recent years a number of small diesel-powered generators have made their way onto the market. Some of them are referred to as “ignition proof” in that their operation will not trigger a gas fume explosion if installed in older gasoline-powered boats. They also have the advantage of being relatively lightweight. Many produce small output, diesel-powered generators in the 2.6 to 4kW range that are useful in even the smallest vessels. Not only do these smaller units provide power for 110V AC tools and equipment, they can keep batteries topped up through various available battery chargers.

With the ever-increasing availability of lithium ion batteries that can be charged very rapidly without adverse effects, generators that produce three-phase power are coming onto the market. These units can produce enough power to charge (through a special charger) a set of lithium batteries in a faction of the time single-phase power can do the same job. Standard appliances don’t like three-phase power, however. A number of smaller generators offer a three-phase option. Another option most of the manufacturers are now making available is a generator with Direct Current (DC) output. These units produce battery-charging power for vessels using an inverter to produce AC current from an onboard battery bank.

Any skipper who is considering adding a new generator to his boat should spend some time determining exactly what his electrical load is likely to be. All electrical appliances have the power requirements listed on the nameplate or electric motor. The power requirement will be listed in watts. When on full, electric heaters, refrigerators and freezers usually require 1,500 watts—to run them all at the same time will take 4.5kW. Don’t forget about a microwave, electric cooktop, water heater, and electronics. After all appliances and systems are examined and the skipper factors in how the electrical system will be used, the total power requirements will be determined and a decision on the type and size of generator can be made.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: southernboating.com

Add a Portable Generator to Your Boat and Expand Your Boating Options – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 16, 2017
South Shore Generator - Boating Options – Wareham, MA

When mariners gather for a discussion about all things boating, a topic that often comes up relates to generators. The generator discussion usually reveals some level of confusion among participants. Some are confused about how powerful their generators should be for their type of boating. Others have concerns about noise and fuel consumption, while still others are concerned about pollution. All of these concerns are legitimate.

Like any other piece of boating equipment, the choice of size and type of generator depends on how it is to be used. If the plan is to take it to the beach to provide power for a sound system or to keep the drinks cold, any number of small, portable gasoline units weighing as little as 50 pounds are available. There are many well-built players in the marine generator market. Research—an indispensable boating skill—will help locate and price these units in any skipper’s local area. Many of these small units are as quiet as the inside of a library—about 60 decibels—and they are so light and small they can easily be carried on all but the smallest boats. Many small boats have them on board as a safety item to provide emergency battery charging, since almost all of them are capable of producing direct current (DC).

If the generator is going to be used to power tools that are part of a vessel’s repair or maintenance system—such as a welding machine on a metal boat—the smaller portable units will generally not do the job. Any generator with an output of at least 5kW will be required if it is to be used as part of the repair and maintenance system of the boat, and it will not produce enough power to run all repair tools at the same time. However, it is perfectly adequate if the person doing the repairs is prepared to use one, or at the most, two power tools at the same time.

A generator of 12.5kW will produce the same power as is usually found in a small land-based home or condo and will generally enable all normal and regular electrical equipment to be operated at once. Larger boats, particularly those equipped with multiple chillers for air conditioning, or electric stoves, ovens, and refrigeration, should be looking at generators capable of producing 15-20kW.

In the past, smaller boats in the 25 to 30-foot range were simply not big enough to be able to carry the weight of an onboard built-in generator system. Similarly, gasoline-powered boats could not have onboard generators due to safety concerns because of gas fumes. However, in recent years a number of small diesel-powered generators have made their way onto the market. Some of them are referred to as “ignition proof” in that their operation will not trigger a gas fume explosion if installed in older gasoline-powered boats. They also have the advantage of being relatively lightweight. Many produce small output, diesel-powered generators in the 2.6 to 4kW range that are useful in even the smallest vessels. Not only do these smaller units provide power for 110V AC tools and equipment, they can keep batteries topped up through various available battery chargers.

With the ever-increasing availability of lithium ion batteries that can be charged very rapidly without adverse effects, generators that produce three-phase power are coming onto the market. These units can produce enough power to charge (through a special charger) a set of lithium batteries in a faction of the time single-phase power can do the same job. Standard appliances don’t like three-phase power, however. A number of smaller generators offer a three-phase option. Another option most of the manufacturers are now making available is a generator with Direct Current (DC) output. These units produce battery-charging power for vessels using an inverter to produce AC current from an onboard battery bank.

Any skipper who is considering adding a new generator to his boat should spend some time determining exactly what his electrical load is likely to be. All electrical appliances have the power requirements listed on the nameplate or electric motor. The power requirement will be listed in watts. When on full, electric heaters, refrigerators and freezers usually require 1,500 watts—to run them all at the same time will take 4.5kW. Don’t forget about a microwave, electric cooktop, water heater, and electronics. After all appliances and systems are examined and the skipper factors in how the electrical system will be used, the total power requirements will be determined and a decision on the type and size of generator can be made.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: southernboating.com

Choosing the Best Portable Generators for Boats – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, May 09, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Portable Marine Generator

When choosing the best portable generators for boats you should take into consideration a number of things, including: the fuel type, portability, whisper-quiet operation, startup methods, fuel tank capacity, runtime at half load, and low-oil shutoff among other features. Before you explore the various capabilities of the best cruising portable generators, you want to lay out how you are going to use your portable generator onboard.

Using Portable Generator Onboard

These portable generators have the ability of providing genuinely practical power to make your boating experience a considerable step up from a wilderness camping experience.

You do not have to heat up your entire cabin with a propane stove to make breakfast when you can use an electric toaster, frying pan, as well as coffee maker from home and run them with a portable generator. In addition, the best portable generators can help you to keep your food and beverages cool without having to make port every now and then to restock your ice supply.

Features of the Best Portable Generators for Boats You Should Look For

You should look for energy efficient portable generators that provide power for your cruising requirements. The best choices should consist of compact gas powered portable generators. The gen-sets should feature engine designs with exceptional specs, including: an effective engine displacement, and a convenient horsepower. Furthermore, the engine should conveniently be air-cooled OHV. The generator you select should be able to power a few of your appliances at once, such as a TV set, coffee maker, and a toaster. The best portable generators for cruising should have a convenient number of power receptacles.

The best portable generators for boats need to provide relatively whisper-quiet operation, and the unit (s) should be lightweight as well as portable. The starting wattage and running wattage of the generator you settle for your boating activities need to be sufficient, and capable of meeting your power requirements, both at startup and continuous operation. The generator (s) needs to have long lasting frame, low-oil shutoff and overload protection. Low-oil shut down and overload protection will ensure that your generator engine is protected against frying up when it runs out of oil, and in the event that there is an overload.

Additional Features to Consider

It is necessary that you choose a portable generator that has a fuel gauge to help you monitor the fuel level at a glance. This will ensure that your lights never go off at night while cruising, since you will know when exactly to refuel. It is advisable to engage models that have multi-purpose control panel, including outlets for powering your boating activities.

The outlets should be made of rubber outlet covers in addition to circuit breaker protection, along with quick reset buttons. Ultimately, generators for boats need to feature easy transportation as well as effortless startup. The fuel tank capacity needs to be sufficient enough, in order for the generator to operate for a considerable number of hours in a single fill.

Conclusion

Having one of the best portable generators onboard will not only guarantee you the availability of power, but also provide your family with the means of using low power appliances. In short, these portable generators are not going to allow you to turn your boat into a floating palace with icemakers and air conditioning, but they do provide a new dimension of comfort to voyaging in a small boat.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham.

Source: smarthomekeeping.com

Generators for Boats: What to Look For? Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, April 24, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

INVERTER OR GENERATOR?

Inverters change the DC power of the boat's batteries into AC power. They're compact and quiet but limited in output by the size of your bank of batteries and by the alternator's ability to keep up with the draw. Battery capacity should be at least three times the expected need between charges. Use inverters for short-term items such as coffeemakers and microwaves. Boats without air conditioning and loads in the 1,000-to-3,500-watt range can get by with inverters. However, for greater and longer power demands you will need a generator.

INVERTER/GENERATOR SYSTEMS

Save money by combining an inverter with a generator. When demands are low, use the inverter. When demands are high-such as when using air conditioning, freezers, and dishwashers-switch to the generator. You may be able to get by with a smaller, less expensive generator.

GAS OR DIESEL?

Match the generator's fuel needs with those of your main engines so you won't need a separate tank, necessitating extra trips to the fuel dock. Diesel is more expensive than gas but also more efficient. If you're buying a gas generator, it must be spark-free to avoid explosions. Also, you'll need to install extra cabin CO alarms.

ENGINE TYPE

Two-cylinder engines tend to vibrate. Four cylinder engines need to be counter-balanced to reduce vibrations. Three- and six-cylinder engines are naturally balanced and run smoothest.

RUNNING RPM

A generator will come to its designed voltage and frequency-60Hz in the United States and Canada-at a preset speed. For most generators, this will be at either 1200, 1800, or 3600 rpm. The 1200 models are large and heavy, and rarely used on pleasure craft. The 1800-rpm models are the most common. They're inexpensive, fuel efficient, quiet, and dependable. A 3600-rpm model might provide more power in a smaller and lighter package, but its high-revving design increases noise and decreases longevity. Consider adding the manufacturer's sound enclosures to minimize sound levels with a 3600-rpm unit.

ENGINE OR HYDRAULIC DRIVE

Hydraulic-drive generators are powered by a hydraulic pump on the main engine. The engine must be running to produce electricity. They're less expensive than self-powered models but are only suited to boats with intermittent power requirements or long-range cruisers that are under power most of the time.

OUTPUT

A generator that is too small will consistently trip breakers, wear out quicker, and possibly damage your electrical equipment. Too large a generator can also operate inefficiently, resulting in carbon buildup on the cylinder heads, and leaving unburned fuel in the exhaust. Never run with a load of 25 percent or less of the generator's output. From 40 to 75 percent is ideal.

ESTIMATING LOAD

List all the wattage requirements of the appliances on your boat. Figure you need the maximum possible load (in watts) to run appliances and lights. Remember, the wattage required to start a motor (on a refrigerator, freezer, or air conditioner) can be many times (up to 10) the normal running wattage. Starting wattage will be noted on the label with running wattage. Factor in this extra load.

COOLING

Most marine generators are water-cooled and can use one of three types of systems. Raw Water: Least expensive. This system circulates raw sea water through the engine. As a result, potential corrosion and contamination problems make them a poor choice for marine use. Heat Exchanger: Most common. Cool raw water is taken from outside the hull and continually passed over a series of coils that are part of the engine's closed freshwater cooling system. Only parts exposed to the raw water are vulnerable to excessive corrosion or contamination. Keel Cooled: This completely sealed freshwater system, foregoes the seawater cooling circuit, opting instead for the closed-loop, water-jacket circuit. A pump to move the coolant through a cooling grid located on the bottom of the boat. This keel cooler must be separate from the main engine's grid.

EASY ACCESS

Look for all common maintenance points, such as the dipstick, filters, and both oil and water fills, to be on one side of the generator body so they'll be close at hand.

SOUND ENCLOSURES

These reduce engine noise, but make access for maintenance difficult. Look for ones with removable panels so you don't have to remove the whole cover to do a small job.

CONTROLS

Typically, a separate unit mounted on top, or integrated within, the generator. Digital microprocessor controls offer significant diagnostic and monitoring capabilities compared to conventional relay controls.

ELECTRONIC FUEL INJECTION

Provides easier starting, lower emissions, and steadier running compared to carbureted engines. Get it.

AUTOMATIC SHUTOFF

Make sure the unit will shut off automatically if there's low oil pressure, high coolant temperature, loss of coolant flow, or high exhaust temperature in a wet exhaust system.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: boatingmag.com

Updating Your Marine Generator Can Pay Off in Many Ways – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, April 17, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

New generators use less fuel, burn cleaner, and produce more power than their predecessors.

As the season nears, it’s a good time to assess any needs or shortcomings your boat might have. The engines were serviced and they’re purring like proverbial kittens. New props were installed and you managed not to ground them. The electronics are current, even the canvas looks brand new. But what about the generator?

Like an insurance policy, or even a loyal deckhand, many of us take the generator for granted. It always kicks on when we need it and provides much-needed juice for the myriad appliances many boats now carry.

Updating your boat’s generator can pay off in a number of ways. The latest and greatest models finally utilize electronic fuel injection to improve efficiency and reduce the output of carbon monoxide.

A control pad makes for simple operation.

Generator sizes are based on their output. The amount of kilowatts they produce is usually the number in the model name. Kohler is one of the manufacturers making low-CO generators, which reduce carbon monoxide emissions, making it safer and more comfortable to be aboard a boat while the generator is running. The Kohler uses throttle-body injection.

Kohler has its own small-footprint diesel model gensets starting with the 490-pound, three-cylinder 6EKOD, which produces 6 kW and offers sophisticated functioning and touchscreen interface. It fits in a 31- by 21- by 22-inch envelope, which should save space in your engine compartment. The 9EKOZD is also powered by a three-cylinder diesel and produces 9 kW. It fits into a 34- by 21- by 22-inch space and weighs 548 pounds. Finally, the 11EKOZD is an 11-kW model based on a four-cylinder diesel engine, weighing in at 616 pounds. Each Kohler genset is available in 50- or 60-hertz models and comes with advanced controllers that provide trouble-free operation. The new touch-style control pad has power and start/stop buttons, a two-line, 12-character display, and a simpler setup process. There’s even a USB port for quick software installations and maintenance downloads. The controller has power management, a fuel primer, a hybrid voltage regulator, and an interface with SmartCraft instrumentation.

If you’re wondering if you need a generator or you can still get by with an inverter, most experts say that if your electronic accessories require more than 3.5 kW, you need a generator. Add up the power requirements for each appliance you plan to run off the generator. Once you arrive at a total in kilowatt-hours, choose a generator rated to produce at least 20 percent more.

Trying to go cheap with a genset rated too close to your total will cost you in the end. Your new generator will wear out quickly and you’ll wind up buying the correct size replacement unit sooner than should be necessary. Don’t go off the deep end in the other direction either. Using an oversize genset runs the unit at an insufficient load, which will cause it to operate inefficiently, which increases fuel consumption. A generator should run at least at 25-percent load with the ideal being 35 to 70 percent.

Finally, if you like to take longer cruises, install a remote canister-style fuel-water separator in-line for your generator. Most gensets come with a small integral fuel-water separator, but the remote version can save you some headaches by preventing contaminants from getting to that smaller filter because it will clog quickly. Position the remote separator ahead of the motor in the hose routing and make it accessible so you can change the element or clean it out if it gets clogged.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: powerandmotoryacht.com


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