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Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

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Generac Generators: Get Prepared for Any Type of Power Outage - Wareham MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 27, 2017

When the storm hits, you're powerless. No refrigerator, no anti-theft systems, no computers, no lights. With Generac, your family stays safe. Powered by natural gas or propane, there are no extension cords to deal with.

No matter what knocks out the power, whether you are home or not, the minute the power goes out the generator goes on. Never feel powerless.

Watch the video to see more information on how your life can remain uninterrupted.


Fore more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham MA.

Choosing a Marine Generator – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 20, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Marine Generator

Today’s sport-fishing boats brim with power-hungry electrical equipment, from air conditioning to audio systems, spreader lights to live-bait pumps, refrigerators to radars and microwaves to water makers.

Supplying enough current for all of these accessories can pose a challenge, particularly on extended trips to fish remote waters with few marinas and no shore power. One option is to run the main engines to keep power flowing to the AC/DC system. Yet fumes, vibration, noise and fuel consumption render this practice annoying, especially on anchor or tied to the dock.

A quiet-running marine generator offers a more pleasing solution. Whether you’re adding, upgrading or ordering a new boat, consider these factors when choosing among the many brands and models of gensets.

Space Constraints

If adding a generator, think about location. Generators go below deck, often in the engine room or an aft compartment. Determine how easily you can access the space for installation and maintenance, as well as how the new unit will affect weight distribution.

For tight spaces, look at compact generator sets. On boats less than 30 feet in length, fitting in a genset could prove impossible. In these cases, a portable generator might be your only option.

Fuel of Choice

For convenience, choose a genset that operates on the same fuel as your boat. For example, with gasoline inboards, select a gasoline generator so you can tap the main tank.

There is one possible exception. On an outboard fishing boat, which runs on gas, it’s sometimes wise to have a diesel generator. Outboard boats rarely feature ventilation for below-deck compartments. Diesel (less volatile than gas) is safer to use in such enclosed spaces. You’ll need a separate diesel tank, so account for that when evaluating available space. If adding a marine generator you’ll also need to customize a system to usher air to the generator.

Most large sport-fishing boats usually have diesel inboards, so a diesel generator makes the most sense. Whether you choose gas or diesel, a separate canister-style fuel filter helps ensure delivery of clean, water-free fuel to the genset.

Output Options

Marine generators are rated by kilowatt output — from as little as 3.5 kW to as much as 200 kW. To determine the right model, add up the power needs for the accessories you plan to run. Then select a marine generator with about 20 percent more output than your total requirement. Resist thinking that more is better. A genset running at insufficient load leads to carbon buildup and other complications. On the other hand, don’t run all of your accessories at once. A genset operates best when carrying 35 percent to 70 percent of its rated load.

Installation Details

Gensets are water cooled, so when adding a unit plan on installing a water intake with a strainer to keep debris from clogging the cooling system. Also, you’ll need plumbing for cooling water to exit overboard.

As mentioned, gensets need air. Yet gensets also need exhaust systems. If adding a unit to your boat, plan on having a separate exhaust rather than sharing the engines’ exhaust system.

Most gensets come with remote ignition switches and basic gauges for installation above deck — usually near the helm or in a cabin — and a second control panel on or near the genset.

Quiet and Clean

Thanks to insulating shields, isolation mounts, mufflers and underwater exhaust, marine generators are quieter than ever. How quiet? Some generate just 66 decibels at a meter away. That’s about the same as a four-stroke outboard at 1,000 rpm when recorded at the helm. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a concern, especially with gas generators. Yet companies such as Kohler now make low-CO gasoline generators with lower emissions. The Kohler Low CO models feature self-monitoring systems that shut down the generator if CO builds to dangerous levels.

As the electrical demands of today’s sport-fishing boats grow, so too does the need for a convenient way to keep the current flowing. Today’s gensets deliver, whether at the dock or far from the marina.

For more information on marine generators, contact South Shore Generator.

Source: Sport Fishing

The Right Size Generator for Your Home – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 13, 2017
South Shore Generator for your home - Warenham, MA

Add up the items you need to power before making your choice

Power outages are often the collateral damage of severe snow and rain storms and other acts of nature. After you've experienced a few you're more likely to consider getting a generator to keep your home’s electricity humming. But before you buy think about whether you want to power your whole house or if you can get by for a few days with just the basics. Here's what we recommend when it comes to choosing the right generator size.

Generators come in two types: portable and stationary, also called standby. Portables cost less to buy and install, but you’ll need to keep it fueled and maintained yourself. A portable also needs to be wheeled outdoors, started, and connected to what you want to power. A stationary model, by contrast, needs to be professionally installed outdoors, which adds expense, but it starts automatically when power cuts off and also performs its own periodic checks—and displays a warning if it needs service.

What to Know About Wattage

To determine generator size, the easiest way is to add up the wattages of everything in your home you want to power with a generator. But some appliances, such as an air conditioner, refrigerator, and sump pumps, require more wattage (called surge watts) when they’re cycling on. It can also be difficult to gauge how much power certain hard-wired appliances, such as your furnace, require. For these reasons we suggest you consult with an electrician, and select a model with a slightly higher rated wattage that will accommodate additional products you might buy.

Also, figure in a few hundred dollars more to install a transfer switch, which allows easy connections for a portable generator. (Stationary generators often come with one.) This component also keeps utility power from frying the circuits you’re protecting once the power returns—and potentially protects any utility workers who might be working on the line. It also protects your generator.

Our generator buying guide lists what the various wattage ranges of both portable and stationary generators will support..

Get Wise About Size

To figure out what generator size you need, follow these simple guidelines. The larger the generator, the more you're likely to pay.

  • Just the basics: Small portable (3,000 to 4,000 watts)
    What it powers: Refrigerator, sump pump, several lights, television.
  • Basics plus creature comforts: Mid-sized portable or small stationary (5,000 to 8,500 watts)
    What it powers: The basics, plus portable heater, computer, heating system, well pump, more lights.
  • A larger load: Large portable (10,000 watts)
    What it powers: Everything above plus small electric water heater, central air conditioner, electric range.
  • The whole house: Large stationary (10,000 to 15,000 watts)
    What it powers: Same as large portables, plus clothes washer, electric dryer.

Some Top Performers

Here are some recommended models from testing over 37 models.

  • Kohler PRO7.5E, $1,400, a 6,300-watt portable that supplied plenty of power, and cleanly, with less noise than many competing models;
  • Generac RS7000E, $900, a 7,000-watt model that performed nearly as well;
  • Generac 6237, $2,250 (with transfer switch), a stationary generator that delivers 7,000 watts using natural gas and 8,000 using propane; and
  • Kohler 14RESAL, $3,700 (with transfer switch), a larger stationary generator that supplied 12,000 watts using natural gas—and 2,000 more with propane.

Whichever generator size you choose, don’t wait until a major storm is forecast to buy it. In addition to facing a more limited selection, you’ll cheat yourself out of the weeks you need to plan your purchase and get it installed before you can enjoy the protection of a generator that will serve you for years to come.

For more information contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: consumerreports.org

Stationary or Portable Generator? – Wareham, MA

Joseph Coupal - Monday, March 06, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac 6237 portable generator

Your power needs, spending power, and ability to roll out the generator when it’s needed are chief criteria for choosing what’s best.

The choice boils down to cost vs. convenience. If you want to be ready for any power outage anytime, nothing beats a stationary generator. Once it’s installed, it just fires up—automatically—when needed. But most people choose a portable generator because it costs far less and is simpler to set up. Here are other benefits and drawbacks of each:

Portable Generators

Power output: For models that can connect to a transfer switch, usually 5,000 to 7,500 watts.

Price range (as tested): $500 to $4,000; inverter generators, $1,600 to $4,500.

Pros: A portable generator can be transported easily from one location to another. Setup is as simple as turning them on and powering items. And they can be shared among neighbors.

Cons: They run on fuel, and fuel storage can be a challenge. And though they include a number of power outlets, running extension cords to a portable generator also poses safety risks; that’s why a transfer switch is recommended.

Fuel needs: A 7,000-watt portable generator will use 12 to 20 gallons of gasoline per day if it runs continuously for 24 hours. More powerful generators use more fuel.

Stationary Generators

Power output: 8,000 to more than 20,000 watts.

Price range: $1,900 to $5,000 or more, plus installation (about $2,000 to $10,000).

Pros: They start automatically when the power goes out and often supply more power. They also periodically run a self-¬diagnosis routine that can alert you to problems. That enables you to get problems fixed before you need the generator. They run on natural gas or propane and save you the hassle and safety risks of storing fuel.

Cons: Beyond the higher cost of purchase and installation, they often require municipal permits and site approvals.

Fuel needs: A small 8,000-watt stationary model can run for eight to 15 days on a 250-gallon propane tank or indefinitely on a natural gas line.

A Greener, Quieter Alternative

Unlike most portable generators, which run at one engine speed, inverter generators have smart circuitry that varies engine speed depending on what they’re powering. That conserves gasoline and cuts down on the noise.

Another important benefit of inverter generators is that they dispense power smoothly at a consistent voltage. That so-called clean power (measured by the Total Harmonic Distortion, THD, in industry lingo) is less likely to damage the sensitive electronics found in computers, TVs, chargers, and many appliances today.

If that kind of clean, even power is a real priority, then consider a stationary generator. They provide more overall wattage and quality of power for the money, even when installation costs are factored in.

For more information, contact South Shore Generators in Wareham, MA.

Source: consumerreports.org


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