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Happy New Year from South Shore Generator

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, December 26, 2017
Happy New Year from South Shore Generator

Happy New Year from South Shore Generator. We would like to thank our customers, friends, family, and community for allowing our business to be part of your lives in 2017. We wish all of you a wonderful and prosperous 2018!

If we have had the pleasure of being your choice in power, we hope that we provided the highest level of customer service, equipment care, and met all of your needs. In the coming months if you find yourself in need of the services we offer, we hope you choose us again in 2018.

It is our sincere wish that in the New Year you are surrounded by warmth, family, and friendship and that 2018 brings you good health and prosperity. From all of us here at South Shore Generator we hope you have a safe and exciting New Year.

“We all come home, or ought to come home, for a short holiday – the longer, the better…” ~ Charles Dickens

Winter Generator Usage: Home and Business Owners Need to Keep Safety in Mind

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 18, 2017
South Shore Generator Generac 6237 portable generator

Generators are critical during severe weather events, when the power can go out, as well as bringing power to remote job sites and in disaster recovery and emergencies. As we move into the upcoming "snow season", a time when electricity can go out due to snow and ice, the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute (OPEI) reminds home and business owners to keep safety in mind when using generators.

Not having power when you need it is frustrating, so a generator can provide emergency backup power at a reasonable cost. But, it’s important to follow all manufacturers’ instructions when using one. For instance, never place a generator in your garage or in your home. The generator should be a safe distance from your home and not near an air intake.

More tips include:

Take stock of your generator. Make sure equipment is in good working order before you start using it.

Follow all manufacturers’ instructions. Review the owner's manuals for your equipment if possible (you can look manuals up online if you cannot find them) so you can operate your equipment safely.

Have the right fuel on hand. Use the type of fuel recommended by your generator manufacturer. It is illegal to use any fuel with more than 10% ethanol in outdoor power equipment (for more information on proper fueling for outdoor power equipment visit www.LookBeforeYouPump.com). If you are using fuel that has been sitting in a gas can for more than 30 days and you cannot get fresh fuel, add fuel stabilizer to it. Store gas only in an approved container and away from heat sources.

Ensure portable generators have plenty of ventilation. Generators should NEVER be used in an enclosed area or placed inside a home or garage, even if the windows or doors are open. Place the generator outside and away from windows, doors, and vents that could allow carbon monoxide to come indoors.

Keep the generator dry. Do not use it in wet conditions. You can cover and vent your generator. You can buy model-specific tents online or generator covers at home centers and hardware stores.

Only add fuel to a cool generator. Before refueling, turn the generator off and let it cool down.

Plug in safely. If you don't yet have a transfer switch, you can use the outlets on the generator. It's best to plug in appliances directly to the generator. If you must use an extension cord, it should be heavy-duty and designed for outdoor use. It should be rated (in watts or amps) at least equal to the sum of the connected appliance loads. Make sure the cord is free of cuts. The plug should have all three prongs.

Install a transfer switch. A transfer switch connects the generator to your circuit panel and lets you power hardwired appliances. Most transfer switches also help you avoid overload by displaying wattage usage levels.

Do not use the generator to "backfeed" power into your home electrical system. Trying to power your home's electrical wiring by "backfeeding" – where you plug the generator into a wall outlet – is reckless and dangerous. You could hurt utility workers and neighbors served by the same transformer. Backfeeding bypasses built-in circuit protection devices, so you could damage your electronics or start an electrical fire.

Install a battery operated carbon monoxide detector in your home or business. This alarm will sound if any carbon monoxide comes into the building and alert you.

For more information on industrial or residential generators, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham.

Source: markets.businessinsider.com

Industrial Generators: Purchase and Installation

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 11, 2017
South Shore Generator - Industrial Generators in Wareham, MA

IBHS recommends retaining an expert with extensive experience with all types of generators to assist with choosing the design and installation of the right generator; specific attention should be paid to the applications required to meet your business needs.

IBHS offers the following guidelines to help you with this process:

Use local contractors, and ask for recommendations and references. Consult with several contractors in-person prior to making a decision.

Make sure the chosen expert helps select the right size generator for your needs. This will include a determination of wattage needs (constant and start-up) and voltage ratings. You also should make sure that whatever generator is chosen is rated to provide power at a frequency of 60 hertz.

Obtain all estimates in writing; including specifics about the work to be performed and the contractor’s license information.

Ask for proof of insurance, for both the manufacturer of the generator and the contractor, as well as a written warranty from the manufacturer and a guarantee from the contractor.

Include the manufacturer and the contractor on the suppliers/vendor forms in your Open for Business® or other business continuity plan.

There may be local codes that require permits and inspections of plans and installation practices. Additionally, any generator transfer switch should be installed by a licensed electrician in order to comply with the National Electrical Code (NEC) as outlined in the National Fire Protection Association Publication No. 72. Some states also have safety regulations designed to prevent “back feed” (see below).

Be sure the contractor walks you through the operations and maintenance processes of the generator. You should also be given all of the operational manuals provided by the manufacturer for reference.

Testing, maintenance and operations

Most emergency generator failures are typically caused by poor testing and maintenance practices. Testing of permanently installed generators should include simulating a real power failure. This practice will test the transfer switch’s function and the generator at the same time.

Please note: Only running the generator will not test the transfer switch’s function, which is a critical element to proper operation during power outage.

Regularly scheduled testing and maintenance of emergency generator equipment is essential to ensure peak performance when you need it most. Maintenance contracts with third parties are a good way to make sure your system achieves prime performance.

Generators — portable or permanently installed — require the use of fuel. Diesel fuel is more prone to oxidation than gasoline, and should never be stored for longer than 12 months. If there are plans to store fuel, a fuel stabilizer should be added.

Many generators use fuel filters to prevent impurities from clogging the fuel lines. Fuel filters should be maintained in accordance with the equipment manufacturers’ recommendations to prevent this problem.

Proper coolant level is critical to the operation of a generator. Check coolant levels prior to start up and monthly for maintenance.

Like any engine, a generator uses oil. Use the right type of oil, maintain the proper oil level and change the oil when it appears dirty.

Check that all air vents or louvers are in good condition, free of dirt and debris, and, if required, that they move freely during operation.

Visually inspect the condition of all hoses, gaskets and gauges to ensure these are free of cracks and operational without leaks.

At start up, check that operating pressures and temperatures are stable and within the manufacturers design parameters.

Also, when the engine is running, check for unusual engine noise and knocking. If there are any unusual sounds, turn the generator off and have it inspected by a professional.

Maintain a log of all test operations and record all readings.

In the event of an impending storm that could result in power outages, test the generator system and top off all liquids at the conclusion of the test.

Do not tamper with safety devices or attempt to repair the generator unless you are a qualified service person.

The total electrical load on your generator should never exceed the manufacturer’s rating.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: disastersafety.org

Facts about Portable Generators and Permanent Generators

Joseph Coupal - Monday, December 04, 2017
South Shore Generator Generac 6237 portable generator

Portable generators are less expensive to purchase and install than permanent (standby) generators. Without a supplemental fuel supply, they have a relatively short run-time and may need to be refueled several times a day during a prolonged power outage.

Most portable generators are designed to work with a few appliances or pieces of electrical equipment that may be plugged directly into the generator without the use of a generator transfer switch.

The above portable generator can be used for small businesses, or in remote locations.

Who should choose this type of generator?

This type of generator be could especially useful for small to mid-sized businesses or in remote locations, but it isn’t recommended if you are operating sensitive equipment or have numerous large appliances or business machines.

It is critical to determine ahead of time what electrical items will be needed during a power outage in order to choose the properly sized generator, and to determine how each item will be connected to the generator.

Is a portable generator right for your business?

Referring to the critical business functions identified in your business continuity plan, and the electrical equipment upon which they depend, will help you decide if a portable generator is sufficient.

Generator Safety

It is very important not to overload a generator. Generator operating manuals typically provide guidelines on power consumption of appliances such as refrigerators, fans, televisions, window mounted air conditioners, etc. but not large commercial equipment.

A business owner may contact a certified electrician to conduct an electrical load analysis of his building and equipment to determine the power consumption of the entire building and individual electrical equipment.

When using a portable generator, you also will have to purchase an electric power cord to feed the electrical equipment. This should be a heavy duty outdoor-rated extension cord sized for the total electrical load (voltage and amps) you may need.

Choose a cord that exceeds the total expected load in order to prevent excessive heat buildup and degradation of the power cord. An overloaded power cord can potentially start a fire.

Ensure that the cord has three prongs and has no splits, cuts or holes in the external insulation covering.

For businesses with multiple locations it may be too expensive to provide generators at each location, so another option may be a rental or lease agreement to have a generator be delivered prior to or immediately after a storm.

Facts about Permanent Generators

A permanent generator is typically wired into your building’s electrical system through a generator transfer switch.

When these switches sense a power outage they will isolate your “emergency” electrical wiring, providing power to the selected equipment from the normal power source, then start to transfer the “emergency” load to the generator.

When the power is restored, the switch also will connect “emergency” circuits back to the utility lines and turn off the generator.

In addition to the convenience of automatic switching, permanent generators offer higher power levels compared to portable units and longer run times.

A permanent generator should be compatible with the fuels available in your area — most models operate with natural gas, propane, or on a bi-fuel basis.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: disastersafety.org


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