Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

CALL US 888-339-4248

Fax: 508-291-2544
Sales Fax: 508-295-9682

2696A Cranberry Hwy, Wareham MA
info@ssgen.com

South Shore Generator Sales & Service Blog - Wareham, MA

RSS Grab RSS Feed

How the Internet Kept Running During The Hurricanes

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 16, 2017
South Shore Generators in Wareham,MA

At one node of the industrial backbone that keeps the internet running, employees sheltered from the worst of Hurricane Irma in a stairwell of a seven-story building in downtown Miami. When the power had gone out, diesel generators instantly kicked in to keep the lights on and prevent the internet from going down.

In Houston, at another of these nodes, called data centers, Hurricane Harvey pushed waters so high that a live fish flopped in a loading dock, but the physical defenses held.

Yet another data center, west of Houston, was so well prepared for the storm — with backup generators, bunks and showers — that employees’ displaced family members took up residence and United States marshals used it as a headquarters until the weather passed.

“It wasn’t Noah’s ark, but it was darn close,” said Rob Morris, managing partner and co-founder of Skybox, the company that runs the center.

For all their seeming immateriality, the internet and the cloud rely on a vast industrial infrastructure consisting of data centers linked through a sprawling network of fiber optics. The facilities are stacked with servers — boxlike computers that crunch the data for everything from hospitals, law enforcement agencies and banks to news websites, email and weather reports — that cannot be without electricity and cooling for even a fraction of a second.

Yet even as millions of people lost power across Florida, and thousands of homes and businesses were flooded out in Miami and Texas, the heavy digital machinery at the heart of the internet and the cloud held firm.

Though the storm disabled some cellphone towers and local connections, the center never stopped processing and transmitting data. It lost utility power around 8:30 a.m. on Sunday, Sept. 10, but supplied its own electricity with the generators.

When the storm eased and he walked outside, Mr. Eassey said, he immediately saw the effect that Digital Realty and other data centers had by keeping the servers going. “Everyone was talking on their phones, searching on their phones, and commerce that uses the internet to do their business was up and running,” he said.

A list of Digital Realty’s top customers shows why those operations are so important: Clients include IBM, Facebook, CenturyLink, Oracle, Yahoo, Morgan Stanley, AT&T and JPMorgan Chase, among others.

Inside the centers, the drill during a natural disaster can be overwhelming. One company, EdgeConneX, lost utility power for three days at a Miami data center, two days at a center in Jacksonville, Fla., and two days at an Atlanta location. But Rich Werner, director of operations at the company, said that backup generators turned on and service was never interrupted.

“Data center operations, to me, is 362 days of boredom,” Mr. Werner said. “And then you get these hurricanes coming through, and it’s three days of pulling your hair out.”

There are no legal standards for data centers unless they house servers for clients like government agencies, which require special protections.

But a professional organization, the Seattle-based Uptime Institute, rates the facilities on four tiers of resiliency for events like storms, earthquakes and run-of-the-mill power failures — possibly one reason the internet performed creditably during the hurricanes. The institute’s engineers “go to the site and pull the plug,” said Mark Harris, senior vice president of marketing, “and to be certified, it has to keep running.”

So when a hurricane or a tornado or an ice storm happens, the entire data center has been designed to withstand these external factors.

During Harvey and Irma, those measures seemed to work, said Doug Madory, director of internet analysis at Dyn, a web performance company with servers at a Miami data center. “I’m not aware of any core internet services going down,” he said.

Practically every single large oil and gas company in the world” operates servers in its data centers — an indication of how commerce of all kind relies on the facilities.

Depending on local conditions, some centers got off easier than others. In Houston facilities run by Data Foundry, automated systems worked so well that employees pooled resources and watched the Floyd Mayweather-Conor McGregor fight on pay-per-view.

Everyone in the business says that extensive preparation is critical.

The peak of the storm passed over the weekend, and when the power went out, the center was ready with diesel generators and a 10,500-gallon diesel tank on the site.

In Houston’s so-called energy corridor, the Skybox campus stayed above water. Utility power never went down. But the site was stocked with thousands of gallons of diesel fuel, as well as food and water, emergency medical kits, showers, bunk rooms and flares.

The site, which is a “modern-day fortress,” began hosting not only employees but several of their families, whose houses were flooded. Then the building doubled as an emergency response center for the United States marshals. Roughly 50 people used or stayed on the campus at one point or another during the storm.

If you want to keep your business up and running during the worst of weather, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: NY Times

Generator Solutions for the Telecommunications Industry

Joseph Coupal - Tuesday, October 10, 2017
South Shore Generators - Generac Telecommunication Industry Generators

The Power to protect your bottom line

For more than 50 years, Generac’s main focus has been providing dependable backup power solutions. And for the last three decades, we have deployed tens of thousands of standby power products to telecommunications installations around the world. As the experts in standby power for the telecommunications industry, many of the largest telecommunications companies rely on Generac to protect their revenue streams and profitability by backing up their infrastructures—including cell sites, data centers, back haul, and hubs—and safeguarding their customers’ experience.

Save on Ownership

Engineered on-site at our vertically integrated manufacturing facilities, Generac standby power systems reduce your total cost of ownership with innovative, space-saving designs. Like single-sided access to maintenance points and controls that significantly reduce the overall generator footprint and save considerably on space leasing costs. And integrated load centers that combine the distribution panel, controls, and transfer switch into a single unit for reduced installation costs and additional space

Enjoy 24/7/365 Support

Get product and technical support from one of the largest factory-certified service organizations in the industry—more than 1500 strong across North America. Dealers who maintain large inventories of Generac parts, components, and accessories to service units in all locations, no matter how remote.

Benefit from Short Lead Times

Customers seek out Generac because we offer some of the fastest delivery times in the industry. We work with our customers to develop rapid deployment programs that cut lead times to less than half of the industry standard. With a 98% on-time delivery rate.

Choose from a Broad Product Line

Generac offers the broadest line of gaseous and diesel-fueled generators in the industry—each of which is custom-configured for your specific application. All major components are designed and manufactured by Generac. The heavy-duty engines we use have proven their performance and reliability in telecommunications applications. And Generac has revolutionized gaseous-fueled generators with advances in technology that make them more powerful and cost-effective—even in large kilowatt applications.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: gens.generac.com

New Kohler Portable Generator Allows You to Select From 3 Different Fuel Types

Joseph Coupal - Monday, October 02, 2017
South Shore Generator - Kohler Pro7.5e portable generator

Expanding the company’s alternative fuels offering, KOHLER is introducing a Tri-Fuel Conversion Kit. Designed to pair with KOHLER’s new PRO9.0 portable generator, the kit enables the PRO9.0 to run on three different fuel types: gasoline, propane or natural gas. Users have the flexibility to select between the three fuel options by swapping out the fuel hose and simply turning a dial.

The tri-fuel portable generator is a great new option because it provides the convenience of three-in- one functionality. The PRO9.0 can be quickly adjusted to run on different fuels, based on fuel availability or a user’s individual preference. Propane and natural gas are sometimes selected due to the reduced emissions and run-time cost savings that those fuels can deliver.

South Shore Generator can quickly configure the new PRO9.0 portable generator with the Tri-Fuel Conversion Kit, while maintaining the product’s original warranty. Like other KOHLER portable generators, the PRO9.0 is backed by a premium three-year warranty and the company also offers a free loaner unit – through participating dealers – for any warranty repairs exceeding 24 hours.

For more information, contact South Shore Generator in Wareham, MA.

Source: power.kohler.com


1

Get e-mail notifications of new blog posts!
Enter email address below.


Recent Posts


Tags


Archive

Join Our Mailing List

Receive email updates on the latest news & products from South Shore Generator Sales & Service ...

Name:

Email:

×